The world's scientific and social network for malaria professionals
Subscribe to free Newsletter | 10180 malaria professionals are enjoying the free benefits of MalariaWorld today

Scientific Articles

Is that a real oocyst? Insectary establishment and identification of Plasmodium falciparum oocysts in midguts of Anopheles mosquitoes fed on infected human blood in Tororo, Uganda

September 3, 2019 - 15:09 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Alex K. Musiime, Joseph Okoth, Chiara Andolina, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:287, 27 August 2019

The human infectious reservoir for malaria consists of individuals capable of infecting mosquitoes. Oocyst prevalence and density are typical indicators of human infectivity to mosquitoes. However, identification of oocysts is challenging, particularly in areas of low malaria transmission intensity where few individuals may infect mosquitoes, and infected mosquitoes tend to have few oocysts. Here, features that differentiate oocysts from other oocyst-like in mosquito midguts are explained and illustrated. In addition, the establishment and maintenance of infrastructure to perform malaria transmission experiments is described. This work may support other initiatives to set up membrane feeding infrastructure and guide oocyst detection in low transmission settings.

Country: 
Medical Condition: 

Low polymorphisms in pfact, pfugt and pfcarl genes in African Plasmodium falciparum isolates and absence of association with susceptibility to common anti-malarial drugs

September 2, 2019 - 15:29 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Francis Tsombeng Foguim, Marie Gladys Robert, Bruno Pradines, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:293, 28 August 2019

Resistance to all available anti-malarial drugs has emerged and spread including artemisinin derivatives and their partner drugs. Several genes involved in artemisinin and partner drugs resistance, such as pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfK13 or pfpm2, have been identified. However, these genes do not properly explain anti-malarial drug resistance, and more particularly clinical failures observed in Africa. Mutations in genes encoding for Plasmodium falciparum proteins, such as P. falciparum Acetyl-CoA transporter (PfACT), P. falciparum UDP-galactose transporter (PfUGT) and P. falciparum cyclic amine resistance locus (PfCARL) have recently been associated to resistance to imidazolopiperazines and other unrelated drugs.

Medical Treatment: 

Sero-identification of the aetiologies of human malaria exposure (Plasmodium spp.) in the Limu Kossa District of Jimma Zone, South western Ethiopia

September 2, 2019 - 15:27 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Sindew Mekasha Feleke, Bokretsion Gidey Brhane, Hassen Mamo, Ashenafi Assefa, Adugna Woyessa, Guilherme Maerschner Ogawa and Vitaliano Cama
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:292, 27 August 2019

Malaria remains a very important public health problem in Ethiopia. Currently, only Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are considered in the malaria diagnostic and treatment policies. However, the existence and prevalence of Plasmodium ovale spp. and Plasmodium malariae in Ethiopia have not been extensively investigated. The objective of this study was to use a multiplex IgG antibody detection assay to evaluate evidence for exposure to any of these four human malaria parasites among asymptomatic individuals.

Country: 

ELQ-331 as a prototype for extremely durable chemoprotection against malaria

September 2, 2019 - 15:25 -- Open Access
Tags: 
Author(s): 
Martin J. Smilkstein, Sovitj Pou, Jane X. Kelly, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:291, 27 August 2019

The potential benefits of long-acting injectable chemoprotection (LAI-C) against malaria have been recently recognized, prompting a call for suitable candidate drugs to help meet this need. On the basis of its known pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles after oral dosing, ELQ-331, a prodrug of the parasite mitochondrial electron transport inhibitor ELQ-300, was selected for study of pharmacokinetics and efficacy as LAI-C in mice.

Medical Condition: 

The experimental study on susceptibility of common European songbirds to Plasmodium elongatum (lineage pGRW6), a widespread avian malaria parasite

September 2, 2019 - 15:21 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Mikas Ilgūnas, Vaidas Palinauskas, Elena Platonova, Tatjana Iezhova and Gediminas Valkiūnas
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:290, 27 August 2019

Plasmodium elongatum (cytochrome b lineage pGRW6) is a widespread avian malaria parasite, often causing severe disease in non-adapted hosts. This parasite lineage is of global distribution however, its virulence remains insufficiently understood, particularly in wild birds. Surprisingly, this infection has never been reported in Common starlings Sturnus vulgaris and Common crossbills Loxia curvirostra, common European songbirds which were extensively sampled across Europe. A hypothesis was proposed that these birds might be resistant to the pGRW6 infection. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis.

Impact of Duffy polymorphisms on parasite density in Brazilian Amazonian patients infected by Plasmodium vivax

September 2, 2019 - 15:19 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Rechfy K. Abou-Ali, Anamika Dhyani, Sérgio R. L. Albuquerque, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:289, 27 August 2019

The Duffy glycoprotein acts as the entry point for merozoites of Plasmodium vivax in the invasion of red blood cells. The host–parasite relationship has revealed new perspectives regarding the association between Duffy polymorphisms that can impact both the parasite density of this Plasmodium and the symptoms of this type of malaria. This study investigates the impact of Duffy polymorphisms on parasite density in patients infected with P. vivax in the Brazilian Amazon region.

Field performance of the malaria highly sensitive rapid diagnostic test in a setting of varying malaria transmission

September 2, 2019 - 15:13 -- Open Access
Tags: 
Author(s): 
Julia Mwesigwa, Hannah Slater, Umberto D’Alessandro, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:288, 27 August 2019

The Gambia has successfully reduced malaria transmission. The human reservoir of infection could further decrease if malaria-infected individuals could be identified by highly sensitive, field-based, diagnostic tools and then treated.

Country: 

Using sibship reconstructions to understand the relationship between larval habitat productivity and oviposition behaviour in Kenyan Anopheles arabiensis

August 27, 2019 - 22:06 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Joel O. Odero, Ulrike Fillinger, Emily J. Rippon, Daniel K. Masiga and David Weetman
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:286, 23 August 2019

Strategies for combatting residual malaria by targeting vectors outdoors are gaining importance as the limitations of primary indoor interventions are reached. Strategies to target ovipositing females or her offspring are broadly applicable because all mosquitoes require aquatic habitats for immature development irrespective of their biting or resting preferences. Oviposition site selection by gravid females is frequently studied by counting early instar larvae in habitats; an approach which is valid only if the number of larvae correlates with the number of females laying eggs. This hypothesis was tested against the alternative, that a higher abundance of larvae results from improved survival of a similar or fewer number of families.

Country: 

Are k13 and plasmepsin II genes, involved in Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives and piperaquine in Southeast Asia, reliable to monitor resistance surveillance in Africa?

August 27, 2019 - 22:03 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Francis Foguim Tsombeng, Mathieu Gendrot, Marie Gladys Robert, Marylin Madamet and Bruno Pradines
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:285, 23 August 2019

Mutations in the propeller domain of Plasmodium falciparum kelch 13 (Pfk13) gene are associated with artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia.

Country: 

The impact on malaria of biannual treatment with azithromycin in children age less than 5 years: a prospective study

August 27, 2019 - 22:00 -- Open Access
Tags: 
Author(s): 
Evan M. Bloch, Beatriz Munoz, Zakayo Mrango, Jerusha Weaver, Leonard E. G. Mboera, Tom M. Lietman, David J. Sullivan Jr. and Sheila K. West
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:284, 23 August 2019

The MORDOR study, a cluster randomized clinical trial, showed that single-dose azithromycin (20 mg/kg) administered biannually for 2 years to preschool children reduced mortality; a study was conducted to determine its effect on clinical symptomatic episodes of malaria as a potential mechanism for mortality benefit.

Person: 
Country: 

Pages

Subscribe to Scientific Articles