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Scientific Articles

Rapid antigen diversification through mitotic recombination in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

May 20, 2019 - 14:48 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Xu Zhang, Noah Alexander, Irina Leonardi, Christopher Mason, Laura A. Kirkman, Kirk W. Deitsch
Reference: 
PLoS Biol 17(5): e3000271

Malaria parasites possess the remarkable ability to maintain chronic infections that fail to elicit a protective immune response, characteristics that have stymied vaccine development and cause people living in endemic regions to remain at risk of malaria despite previous exposure to the disease.

Cyclic AMP signalling controls key components of malaria parasite host cell invasion machinery

May 20, 2019 - 14:32 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Avnish Patel, Abigail J. Perrin, David A. Baker, et al.
Reference: 
PLoS Biol 17(5): e3000264

Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is an important signalling molecule across evolution, but its role in malaria parasites is poorly understood.

Not Open Access | γδ-T cells promote IFN-γ–dependent Plasmodium pathogenesis upon liver-stage infection

May 20, 2019 - 14:31 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Julie C. Ribot, Rita Neres, Ana Pamplona, et al.
Reference: 
PNAS May 14, 2019 116 (20) 9979-9988

Cerebral malaria (CM) is a major cause of death due to Plasmodium infection.

Malaria impact on cognitive function of children in a peri-urban community in the Brazilian Amazon

May 20, 2019 - 13:40 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Raquel Tapajós, Daniel Castro, Maria Paula Mourão, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:173, 16 May 2019

In Latin America, where Plasmodium vivax malaria is more prevalent, it is known that this species plays an important role in the sustainability of transmission, and can have an impact on morbidity in terms of anaemia, nutritional status, and cognitive development in children.

Malaria Surveillance — United States, 2016

May 20, 2019 - 13:33 -- Open Access
Tags: 
Author(s): 
Kimberly E. Mace, Paul M. Arguin, Naomi W. Lucchi, Kathrine R. Tan
Reference: 
Surveillance Summaries / May 17, 2019 / 68(5); 1–35

Malaria in humans is caused by intraerythrocytic protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. These parasites are transmitted by the bite of an infective female Anopheles species mosquito. The majority of malaria infections in the United States occur among persons who have traveled to regions with ongoing malaria transmission. However, malaria is occasionally acquired by persons who have not traveled out of the country through exposure to infected blood products, congenital transmission, laboratory exposure, or local mosquitoborne transmission. Malaria surveillance in the United States is conducted to provide information on its occurrence (e.g., temporal, geographic, and demographic), guide prevention and treatment recommendations for travelers and patients, and facilitate transmission control measures if locally acquired cases are identified.

Barriers in distribution, ownership and utilization of insecticide-treated mosquito nets among migrant population in Myanmar, 2016: a mixed methods study

May 14, 2019 - 15:55 -- Open Access
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Author(s): 
Shwe Yi Linn, Thae Maung Maung, Jaya Prasad Tripathy, Hemant Deepak Shewade, Swai Mon Oo, Zaw Linn and Aung Thi
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:172, 14 May 2019

Sleeping under insecticide-treated mosquito nets/long-lasting insecticidal nets (ITNs/LLINs henceforth referred to as ITNs) is one of the core interventions recommended by the World Health Organization to reduce malaria transmission and prevent malaria in high-risk communities, such as migrants, by preventing mosquito bites. The malaria burden among the migrant population is a big challenge for malaria elimination in Myanmar. In this context, this study aimed to assess the ownership and utilization of ITNs and to understand the barriers to distribution and utilization of ITNs among the high-risk migrant communities in the Regional Artemisinin Resistance Initiative (RAI) project areas of Myanmar.

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How far is the journey before malaria is knocked out malaria in Zimbabwe: results of the malaria indicator survey 2016

May 14, 2019 - 15:53 -- Open Access
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Author(s): 
Busisani Dube, Joseph Mberikunashe, Patience Dhliwayo, Andrew Tangwena, Gerald Shambira, Anderson Chimusoro, Munashe Madinga and Brighton Gambinga
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:171, 14 May 2019

Zimbabwe conducts Malaria Indicator Surveys after 3 years and Demographic and Health Surveys to track the impact of malaria interventions. The last one to be conducted was in 2016 and had set an aim aimed to collect data to track malaria indicators as well as to save as the baseline source for the Malaria Strategic Plan (2016–2020).

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Severe malaria management: current situation, challenges and lessons learned from Gezira State, Sudan

May 14, 2019 - 15:52 -- Open Access
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Author(s): 
Fahad A. Elnour, Mohammed E. A. Alagib, Devendra Bansal, Elmoubasher Abu Baker Abd Farag and Elfatih M. Malik
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:170, 14 May 2019

The present study aimed to evaluate the management of severe malaria at Gezira State hospitals in Sudan by assessing hospital readiness, health care provider knowledge and the care received by severe malaria patients.

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Malaria prevention in the city of Yaoundé: knowledge and practices of urban dwellers

May 13, 2019 - 15:30 -- Open Access
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Author(s): 
Abdou Talipouo, Carmene S. Ngadjeu, Christophe Antonio-Nkondjio, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:167, 9 May 2019

Malaria prevention in Cameroon mainly relies on the use of ITNs. Although several free distribution campaigns of treated nets have been conducted across the country, bed net usage remains very low. A household survey was conducted to assess knowledge of the population and practices affecting treated net usage in the city of Yaoundé.

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Medical Treatment: 

Autodissemination of pyriproxyfen suppresses stable populations of Anopheles arabiensis under semi-controlled settings

May 13, 2019 - 14:37 -- Open Access
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Author(s): 
Dickson Lwetoijera, Samson Kiware, Fredros Okumu, Gregor J. Devine and Silas Majambere
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:166, 9 May 2019

Autodissemination of pyriproxyfen (PPF), i.e. co-opting adult female mosquitoes to transfer the insect growth regulator, pyriproxyfen (PPF) to their aquatic habitats has been demonstrated for Aedes and Anopheles mosquitoes. This approach, could potentially enable high coverage of aquatic mosquito habitats, including those hard to locate or reach via conventional larviciding. This study demonstrated impacts of autodissemination in crashing a stable and self-sustaining population of the malaria vector, Anopheles arabiensis under semi-field conditions in Tanzania.

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