The world's scientific and social network for malaria professionals
Subscribe to free Newsletter | 10366 malaria professionals are enjoying the free benefits of MalariaWorld today

Scientific Articles

Extreme Polymorphism in a Vaccine Antigen and Risk of Clinical Malaria: Implications for Vaccine Development

October 25, 2009 - 17:04 -- Bart G.J. Knols
Author(s): 
Shannon L. Takala et al.
Reference: 
Science Translational Medicine. 2009; 1:2ra5

Vaccines directed against the blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum malaria are intended to prevent the parasite from invading and replicating within host cells. No blood-stage malaria vaccine has shown clinical efficacy in humans. Most malaria vaccine antigens are parasite surface proteins that have evolved extensive genetic diversity, and this diversity could allow malaria parasites to escape vaccine-induced immunity. We examined the extent and within-host dynamics of genetic diversity in the blood-stage malaria vaccine antigen apical membrane antigen–1 in a longitudinal study in Mali. 

Technology: 
Country: 
Medical Condition: 
Medical Treatment: 

Distillery: Therapeutic: Plasmepsin (Plasmodium falciparum)

October 25, 2009 - 17:01 -- Bart G.J. Knols
Author(s): 
-
Reference: 
Science-Business eXchange 2, (15 October 2009) doi:10.1038/scibx.2009.1508

In vitro studies identified a plasmepsin inhibitor that could aid in the development of new treatments for malaria. Further details on the research, next steps and licensing status are discussed in the article.

 

Special Focus Review: A biologist’s perspective on malaria vaccine development

October 25, 2009 - 16:57 -- Ingeborg van Schayk
Tags: 
Author(s): 
Robert Sinden
Reference: 
Human Vaccines, Volume 6, Issue 1, January 2010

A vaccine to reduce human suffering caused by malarial parasites has been the holy grail of malaria research. Early studies in the 1940’s indicated that attenuated parasites could induce useful immunity. Since that time the genomic revolution led inevitably to the idea of cheap production of safe recombinant vaccines using either expressed protein or DNA vector technologies.

Medical Treatment: 

Review: Embryotoxicity of the artemisinin antimalarials and potential consequences for use in women in the first trimester

October 25, 2009 - 16:56 -- Bart G.J. Knols
Author(s): 
Robert L. Clark
Reference: 
Reproductive Toxicology, Volume 28, Issue 3, November 2009, Pages 285-296, doi:10.1016/j.reprotox.2009.05.002

Single oral doses of artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, arteether and artemether administered to rats during a sensitive period of organogenesis caused embryo deaths and malformations (malformed long bones and ventricular septal defects). Extended oral dosing (12 days or more) of monkeys once daily with 12 mg/kg-d artesunate also caused embryo deaths. The initial embryotoxic effect in both species was to kill primitive erythroblasts which are present in the embryo for a few days of gestation in rats and several weeks in primates.

 

Technology: 
Medical Condition: 

Special Focus Review: Malaria vaccine development: An endemic country perspective

October 25, 2009 - 16:52 -- Ingeborg van Schayk
Tags: 
Author(s): 
Kwadwo A. Koram and Ben A. Gyan
Reference: 
Human Vaccines, Volume 6, Issue 1, January 2010

The quest for an effective vaccine as an additional strategy in the control of malaria and to significantly impact the disease burden has progressed tremendously over the past decade and there is a very high probability that that a malaria vaccine will be available for use in the near future. The introduction of any malaria vaccine will be confronted by some cultural issues and it is essential to understand how these factors will ultimately affect its utilization. These and other challenges related to the development and deployment of an effective malaria vaccine especially as they concern endemic countries are discussed.

Medical Condition: 
Medical Treatment: 

Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Malaria: Cytochemical Detection of Heterozygous G6PD Deficiency in Women

October 25, 2009 - 16:51 -- Bart G.J. Knols
Author(s): 
Anna L. Peters and Cornelis J.F. Van Noorden
Reference: 
J. Histochem. Cytochem. 2009; 57:1003-1011

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a X-chromosomally transmitted disorder of the erythrocyte that affects 400 million people worldwide. Diagnosis of heterozygously-deficient women is complicated: as a result of lyonization, these women have a normal and a G6PD-deficient population of erythrocytes. The cytochemical assay is the only reliable assay to discriminate between heterozygously-deficient women and non-deficient women or homozygously-deficient women. G6PD deficiency is mainly found in areas where malaria is or has been endemic.

Medical Condition: 

Quassinoid constituents of Quassia amara L. leaf herbal tea. Impact on its antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity

October 25, 2009 - 16:43 -- Bart G.J. Knols
Author(s): 
Emeline Houël, Stéphane Bertani, Geneviève Bourdy, Eric Deharo, Valérie Jullian, Alexis Valentin, Séverine Chevalley, Didier Stien
Reference: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Volume 126, Issue 1, 29 October 2009, Pages 114-118, doi:10.1016/j.jep.2009.07.037

Our objective was to assess whether it could be contemplated to recommend Quassia amara young leaf tea for treatment against malaria, and if yes, set up a standard protocol for preparing the herbal tea. In conclusion, this preparation should not be recommended for treatment of malaria until a clinical study in humans is performed with SkD.

 

Technology: 
Medical Condition: 

Special Focus Review: From the circumsporozoite protein to the RTS,S/AS candidate vaccine

October 25, 2009 - 16:43 -- Ingeborg van Schayk
Tags: 
Author(s): 
Joe Cohen, Victor Nussenzweig, Johan Vekemans and Amanda Leach
Reference: 
Human Vaccines, Volume 6, Issue 1, January 2010

The RTS,S/AS01E malaria vaccine candidate has recently entered phase 3 testing. Reaching this important milestone is the culmination of more than 20 years of research and development by GlaxoSmithKline and partners and collaborators. The vaccine has been developed to protect young children and infants living in sub-Saharan Africa against clinical and severe disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection.

Continent: 
Medical Condition: 
Medical Treatment: 

Association of Malaria-Induced Murine Pregnancy Failure with Robust Peripheral and Placental Cytokine Responses

October 25, 2009 - 16:36 -- Bart G.J. Knols
Author(s): 
Jayakumar Poovassery and Julie M. Moore
Reference: 
Infect. Immun. 2009;77 4998-5006

Plasmodium chabaudi AS infection during early pregnancy results in midgestational embryonic loss in naive C57BL/6 mice. To define the immunopathogenesis of this malaria-induced pregnancy compromise, cytokine production in plasma, spleen, and placenta cell culture supernatants during the first 11 days of infection and gestation was studied. These results suggest that systemic and placenta-level proinflammatory antimalarial immune responses, in the absence of adequate and sustained counterregulatory mechanisms, contribute to pregnancy loss in this model.

 

Technology: 
Medical Condition: 
Medical Treatment: 

Current status of Plasmodium vivax vaccine

October 25, 2009 - 16:36 -- Ingeborg van Schayk
Tags: 
Author(s): 
Myriam Arévalo-Herrera, Chetan Chitnis and Sócrates Herrera
Reference: 
Human Vaccines, Volume 6, Issue 1, January 2010

The increasing P. vivax drug resistance and reports of severe and lethal cases, the relapsing parasite behavior and the existence of Plasmodium spp co-infections must prompt more investment and greater efforts for the development of P. vivax vaccine.

Medical Treatment: 

Pages

Subscribe to Scientific Articles