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  • Reply to: Research: Supplementary effect and durability of prototype insecticide-treated eave curtains on indoor resting mosquitoes in Kadibo division, Western Kenya   1 day 17 hours ago
    Dear William, the door hanger strips was basically the best option that could be rolled out as part of a campaign (as we imagined the solution would be). The door screens would require fairly uniform sized and, equivalently important, straight angled door frames in order to arrive pre-fitted and to close properly. In the intervention area neither were present. The door strips could be measured out and installed in about 2 min. We did not count fly entry but anecdotally people noted reduced entry of flies, wasps and other insects. In addition to the problem of (pre-)fitting the screens, a good well fitting door screen would also be much more expensive. If this was to be a market driven solution (vs campaign), I would agree that proper screen should be considered
  • Reply to: Message from Pedro Alonso, Director GMP: Welcoming Dr Fred Binka to WHO   1 day 23 hours ago

    My hearty congratulations Professor Binka

  • Reply to: Message from Pedro Alonso, Director GMP: Welcoming Dr Fred Binka to WHO   4 days 6 hours ago

    Congratulations.. with his presence will further reinforce and contain the spread of artemisinin resistance in GMS & neighboring areas. Best wishes

  • Reply to: Eave tubes for malaria control in Africa: an introduction   5 days 19 hours ago
    I totally agree that we need new innovations and I am not saying Eaves do not work. Despite some non-compliance LLINs have had the greatest impact on Global malaria in history and they are ridiculously cheap. IRS offers the chance of new a.i.`s which are currently in WHOPES and should be launched 2017. There are many innovations such as traps, eaves curtains ATSB`s etc. etc. but donors and MOH`s look at cost today not cost over 10 years. We have tried to market stronger nets with minimum 5 year life but the customer only looks at price even if the product is poor quality. So lets see if donors and MOH`s are willing to invest in eaves tubes as a long term measure... only time will tell.
  • Reply to: Eave tubes for malaria control in Africa: an introduction   6 days 8 hours ago
    So John Invest, you say it only takes 20 minutes to spray a house. But the US Presidential Malaria Initiative has been spraying the same houses for 10 years, sometimes twice a year. That gives a cost advantage to permanent measures such as eave tubes, or metallic screens. And putting up bednets is sometimes a nightly chore, and thus often neglected.