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Amazon

Local emergence in Amazonia of Plasmodium falciparum k13 C580Y mutants associated with in vitro artemisinin resistance

May 13, 2020 - 14:50 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Mathieu LC, Cox H, Musset L, et al.
Reference: 
Elife. 2020 May 12;9. pii: e51015

Antimalarial drug resistance has historically arisen through convergent de novo mutations in Plasmodium falciparum parasite populations in Southeast Asia and South America. For the past decade in Southeast Asia, artemisinins, the core component of first-line antimalarial therapies, have experienced delayed parasite clearance associated with several pfk13 mutations, primarily C580Y.

Prospective assessment of malaria infection in a semi-isolated Amazonian indigenous Yanomami community: Transmission heterogeneity and predominance of submicroscopic infection

March 23, 2020 - 14:18 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Robortella DR, Calvet AA, Carvalho LH, et al.
Reference: 
PLoS ONE 15(3): e0230643

In the Amazon basin, indigenous forest-dwelling communities typically suffer from a high burden of infectious diseases, including malaria. Difficulties in accessing these isolated ethnic groups, such as the semi-nomadic Yanomami, make official malaria data largely underestimated. In the current study, we longitudinally surveyed microscopic and submicroscopic malaria infection in four Yanomami villages of the Marari community in the northern-most region of the Brazilian Amazon.

Not Open Access | Amazon deforestation drives malaria transmission, and malaria burden reduces forest clearing

November 5, 2019 - 12:45 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Andrew J. MacDonald and Erin A. Mordecai
Reference: 
PNAS October 29, 2019 116 (44) 22212-22218

Deforestation and land use change are among the most pressing anthropogenic environmental impacts. In Brazil, a resurgence of malaria in recent decades paralleled rapid deforestation and settlement in the Amazon basin, yet evidence of a deforestation-driven increase in malaria remains equivocal.

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