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female mosquitoes

Seasonal dynamics and molecular differentiation of three natural Anopheles species (Diptera: Culicidae) of the Maculatus group (Neocellia series) in malaria hotspot villages of Thailand

November 14, 2020 - 16:12 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Sumruayphol S, Chaiphongpachara T, Samung Y, Ruangsittichai J, Cui L, Zhong D, Sattabongkot J, Sriwichai P
Reference: 
Parasit Vectors. 2020 Nov 11;13(1):574

Anopheles sawadwongporni Rattanarithikul & Green, Anopheles maculatus Theobald and Anopheles pseudowillmori (Theobald) of the Anopheles maculatus group (Diptera: Culicidae) are recognized as potential malaria vectors in many countries from the Indian subcontinent through Southeast Asia to Taiwan. A number of malaria vectors in malaria hotspot areas along the Thai-Myanmar border belong to this complex. However, the species distribution and dynamic trends remain understudied in this malaria endemic region.

Modelling the suppression of a malaria vector using a CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive to reduce female fertility

August 13, 2020 - 11:38 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
North AR, Burt A, Godfray HCJ
Reference: 
BMC Biol. 2020 Aug 11;18(1):98

Gene drives based on CRISPR-Cas9 technology are increasingly being considered as tools for reducing the capacity of mosquito populations to transmit malaria, and one of the most promising options is driving endonuclease genes that reduce the fertility of female mosquitoes. In particular, there is much interest in constructs that target the conserved mosquito doublesex (dsx) gene such that the emergence of functional drive-resistant alleles is unlikely. Proof of principle that these constructs can lead to substantial population suppression has been obtained in population cages, and they are being evaluated for use in sub-Saharan Africa. Here, we use simulation modelling to understand the factors affecting the spread of this type of gene drive over a one million-square kilometre area of West Africa containing substantial environmental and social heterogeneity.

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