The world's scientific and social network for malaria professionals
Subscribe to free Newsletter | 10858 malaria professionals are enjoying the free benefits of MalariaWorld today

IPTp

Community delivery of malaria intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy: protocol of a quasi-experimental evaluation through multistage cluster sampling household surveys in four sub-Saharan African countries

March 31, 2021 - 14:29 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Pons-Duran C, Llach M, Sanz S, Ramírez M, Méndez S, Roman E, Tholandi M, Pagnoni F, Menendez C, González R
Reference: 
BMJ Open. 2021 Mar 25;11(3):e044680

In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), millions of pregnant women are exposed to malaria infection. The cornerstone of the WHO strategy to prevent malaria in pregnancy in moderate to high-transmission areas is the administration of intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine at each scheduled antenatal care (ANC) visit. However, overall coverage remains low. ‘Transforming IPT for Optimal Pregnancy’ (TIPTOP) project aims at delivering IPTp at the community level (C-IPTp) to complement ANC provision with the goal of increasing IPTp coverage and improving maternal and infant’s health. This protocol describes the approach to measure the effect of this strategy through household surveys (HHS) in four SSA countries: Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Madagascar, Mozambique and Nigeria.

A socio-ecological approach to understanding the factors influencing the uptake of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) in South-Western Nigeria

March 17, 2021 - 16:45 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Nyaaba GN, Olaleye AO, Obiyan MO, Walker O, Anumba DOC
Reference: 
PLoS One. 2021 Mar 15;16(3):e0248412

Malaria in pregnancy (MiP) remains a key cause of poor maternal and neonatal health outcomes, particularly in the African region. Two strategies globally promoted to address MiP require pregnant women in malaria-endemic regions to sleep under insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) and take at least three doses of intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) during pregnancy. Yet, several multilevel factors influence the effective uptake of these strategies. This study explored the factors for the poor uptake of IPTp and use of ITNs in lower socio-economic communities in Nigeria.

Reduced birth weight caused by sextuple drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum infection in early 2nd trimester

March 9, 2021 - 15:32 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Hansson H, Minja DTR, Schmiegelow C, et al.
Reference: 
J Infect Dis. 2021 Mar 4:jiab117

Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum genes Pfdhfr and Pfdhps, particularly the sextuple mutant haplotype threatens the antimalarial effectiveness of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine as intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPTp). To explore the impact of sextuple mutant haplotype infections on outcome measures after provision of IPTp-SP, we monitored birth outcomes in women followed from prior to conception or from the first trimester until delivery.

Low prevalence of highly sulfadoxine‐resistant dihydropteroate synthase alleles in Plasmodium falciparum isolates in Benin

February 8, 2021 - 10:52 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Samaly Souza Svigel, Adicath Adeothy, Naomi W. Lucchi, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:72, 5 February 2021

In 2004, in response to high levels of treatment failure associated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance, Benin changed its first-line malaria treatment from SP to artemisinin-based combination therapy for treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Resistance to SP is conferred by accumulation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in P. falciparum genes involved in folate metabolism, dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps), targeted by pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine, respectively. Because SP is still used for intermittent preventive treatment in pregnant women (IPTp) and seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMCP) in Benin, the prevalence of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps SNPs in P. falciparum isolates collected in 2017 were investigated.

Drug treatment and prevention of malaria in pregnancy: a critical review of the guidelines

January 27, 2021 - 15:49 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Khalid A. J. Al Khaja and Reginald P. Sequeira
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:62, 23 January 2021

Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum in pregnancy can result in adverse maternal and fetal sequelae. This review evaluated the adherence of the national guidelines drawn from World Health Organization (WHO) regions, Africa, Eastern Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and Western Pacific, to the WHO recommendations on drug treatment and prevention of chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria in pregnant women.

Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine parasitological efficacy against Plasmodium falciparum among pregnant women and molecular markers of resistance in Zambia: an observational cohort study

January 27, 2021 - 15:46 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Enesia Banda Chaponda, Sungano Mharakurwa, Charles Michelo, Jane Bruce, Daniel Chandramoha and R. Matthew Chico
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:61, 22 January 2021

The World Health Organization recommends the provision of intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) at 4-week intervals from gestational week 13 to delivery in areas of moderate to high malaria transmission intensity. However, the effect of IPTp-SP has been compromised in some areas due to parasite resistance, raising the importance of parasitological and chemoprophylactic surveillance, and monitoring SP-resistance markers in the Plasmodium falciparum population.

Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum dihydropteroate synthetase and dihydrofolate reductase genes in Nigerian children with uncomplicated malaria using high-resolution melting technique

January 16, 2021 - 09:38 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Kayode AT, Ajogbasile FV, Akano K, Uwanibe JN, Oluniyi PE, Eromon PJ, Folarin OA, Sowunmi A, Wirth DF, Happi CT
Reference: 
Sci Rep. 2021 Jan 12;11(1):471

In 2005, the Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health revised the treatment policy for uncomplicated malaria with the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). This policy change discouraged the use of Sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as the second-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. However, SP is used as an intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) and seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) in children aged 3-59 months. There have been increasing reports of SP resistance especially in the non-pregnant population in Nigeria, thus, the need to continually monitor the efficacy of SP as IPTp and SMC by estimating polymorphisms in dihydropteroate synthetase (dhps) and dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) genes associated with SP resistance.

Determinants of uptake of malaria preventive interventions among pregnant women in eastern Uganda

January 6, 2021 - 11:43 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Solomon Tsebeni Wafula, Hilbert Mendoza, Aisha Nalugya, David Musoke and Peter Waiswa
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:5, 3 January 2021

Consistent use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) and intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) have been recommended as cost-effective interventions for malaria prevention during pregnancy in endemic areas. However, the coverage and utilization of these interventions during pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa is still suboptimal. This study aimed to determine the uptake of IPTp and ITNs and associated factors among women during their recent pregnancy in Eastern Uganda.

Piperaquine pharmacokinetics during intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy

December 29, 2020 - 15:37 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Chotsiri P, Gutman J, Tarning J, et al.
Reference: 
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2020 Dec 23:AAC.01150-20

Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) is a long-acting artemisinin combination treatment that provides effective chemoprevention and has been proposed as an alternative antimalarial drug for intermittent-preventive therapy in pregnancy (IPTp). Several pharmacokinetic studies have shown that dose adjustment may not be needed for the treatment of malaria in pregnancy with DP. However, there are limited data on the optimal dosing for IPTp.

Infant sex modifies associations between placental malaria and risk of malaria in infancy

December 3, 2020 - 13:06 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Abel Kakuru, Michelle E. Roh, Prasanna Jagannathan, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:449, 3 December 2020

Placental malaria (PM) has been associated with a higher risk of malaria during infancy. However, it is unclear whether this association is causal, and is modified by infant sex, and whether intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) can reduce infant malaria by preventing PM.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - IPTp