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Human exposure

Patterns of human exposure to malaria vectors in Zanzibar and implications for malaria elimination efforts

June 26, 2020 - 15:11 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
April Monroe, Dickson Msaky, Fredros Okumu, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:212, 22 June 2020

Zanzibar provides a good case study for malaria elimination. The islands have experienced a dramatic reduction in malaria burden since the introduction of effective vector control interventions and case management. Malaria prevalence has now been maintained below 1% for the past decade and the islands can feasibly aim for elimination.

Methods and indicators for measuring patterns of human exposure to malaria vectors

June 17, 2020 - 13:04 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
April Monroe, Sarah Moore, Fredros Okumu, Samson Kiware, Neil F. Lobo, Hannah Koenker, Ellie Sherrard-Smith, John Gimnig and Gerry F. Killeen
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:207, 16 June 2020

Effective targeting and evaluation of interventions that protect against adult malaria vectors requires an understanding of how gaps in personal protection arise. An improved understanding of human and mosquito behaviour, and how they overlap in time and space, is critical to estimating the impact of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) and determining when and where supplemental personal protection tools are needed. Methods for weighting estimates of human exposure to biting Anopheles mosquitoes according to where people spend their time were first developed over half a century ago. However, crude indoor and outdoor biting rates are still commonly interpreted as indicative of human-vector contact patterns without any adjustment for human behaviour or the personal protection effects of ITNs.

Human exposure to Anopheles farauti bites in the Solomon Islands is not associated with IgG antibody response to the gSG6 salivary protein of Anopheles gambiae

October 7, 2019 - 15:20 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Edgar J. M. Pollard, Catriona Patterson, Tanya L. Russell, Alan Apairamo, Jance Oscar, Bruno Arcà, Chris Drakeley and Thomas R. Burkot
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:334, 1 October 2019

Mosquito saliva elicits immune responses in humans following mosquito blood feeding. Detection of human antibodies recognizing the Anopheles gambiae salivary gland protein 6 (gSG6) or the gSG6-P1 peptide in residents of Africa, South America and Southeast Asia suggested the potential for these antibodies to serve as a universal marker to estimate human biting rates. Validating the utility of this approach requires concurrent comparisons of anopheline biting rates with antibodies to the gSG6 protein to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the assay for monitoring changes in vector populations. This study investigated whether seroprevalence of anti-gSG6 antibodies in humans reflected the relative exposure to Anopheles farauti bites in the Solomon Islands as estimated from sympatric human landing catches.

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