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G6PD

The integrity and stability of specimens under different storage conditions for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency screening using WST-8

May 5, 2021 - 08:56 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Chamchoy K, Praoparotai A, Pakparnich P, Sudsumrit S, Swangsri T, Chamnanchanunt S, Songdej D, Imwong M, Boonyuen U
Reference: 
Acta Trop. 2021 May;217:105864

Accurate measurement of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity is critical for malaria treatment as misclassification of G6PD deficiency could cause serious harm to patients. G6PD activity should be assessed in blood samples on the day of collection. Otherwise, specimens should be stored under suitable conditions to prevent loss of G6PD activity.

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in individuals with and without malaria: Analysis of clinical trial, cross-sectional and case-control data from Bangladesh

April 28, 2021 - 14:19 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Ley B, Alam MS, Price RN, et al.
Reference: 
PLoS Med. 2021 Apr 23;18(4):e1003576

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity is dependent upon G6PD genotype and age of the red blood cell (RBC) population, with younger RBCs having higher activity. Peripheral parasitemia with Plasmodium spp. induces hemolysis, replacing older RBCs with younger cells with higher G6PD activity. This study aimed to assess whether G6PD activity varies between individuals with and without malaria or a history of malaria.

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations in malaria endemic area of Thailand by multiplexed high‐resolution melting curve analysis

April 21, 2021 - 15:07 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Usa Boonyuen, Duantida Songdej, Mallika Imwong, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:194, 20 April 2021

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the most common enzymopathy in humans, is prevalent in tropical and subtropical areas where malaria is endemic. Anti-malarial drugs, such as primaquine and tafenoquine, can cause haemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals. Hence, G6PD testing is recommended before radical treatment against vivax malaria. Phenotypic assays have been widely used for screening G6PD deficiency, but in heterozygous females, the random lyonization causes difficulty in interpreting the results. Over 200 G6PD variants have been identified, which form genotypes associated with differences in the degree of G6PD deficiency and vulnerability to haemolysis. This study aimed to assess the frequency of G6PD mutations using a newly developed molecular genotyping test.

Protective effect of Mediterranean type glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency against Plasmodium vivax malaria

February 8, 2021 - 10:44 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Awab GR, Aaram F, Jamornthanyawat N, Suwannasin K, Pagornrat W, Watson JA, Woodrow CJ, Dondorp AM, Day NP, Imwong M, White NJ
Reference: 
Elife. 2021 Feb 5;10:e62448

X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy. The severe Mediterranean variant (G6PD Med) found across Europe and Asia is thought to confer protection against malaria, but its effect is unclear. We fitted a Bayesian statistical model to observed G6PD Med allele frequencies in 999 Pashtun patients presenting with acute Plasmodium vivax malaria and 1408 population controls.

Molecular characterization of G6PD mutations reveals the high frequency of G6PD Aures in the Lao Theung population

January 13, 2021 - 09:57 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Amkha Sanephonasa, Chalisa Louicharoen Cheepsunthorn, Naly Khaminsou, Onekham Savongsy, Issarang Nuchprayoon and Kamonlak Leecharoenkiat
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:30, 7 January 2021

The prevalence and genotypes of G6PD deficiency vary worldwide, with higher prevalence in malaria endemic areas. The first-time assessment of G6PD deficiency prevalence and molecular characterization of G6PD mutations in the Lao Theung population were performed in this study.

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and susceptibility to childhood diseases in Kilifi, Kenya

December 8, 2020 - 10:52 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Uyoga S, Macharia AW, Ndila CM, Nyutu G, Shebe M, Awuondo KO, Mturi N, Peshu N, Tsofa B, Scott JAG, Maitland K, Williams TN
Reference: 
Blood Adv. 2020 Dec 8;4(23):5942-5950

Few previous studies have reported the effects of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficiency on child health in Africa. We conducted a case-control study in which cases (n = 6829) were children admitted, for any reason, to Kilifi County Hospital, Kenya, while controls (n = 10 179) were recruited from the surrounding community. Cases were subclassified based on their clinical and laboratory findings at admission.

Epidemiology, evolutionary origin, and malaria-induced positive selection effects of G6PD-deficient alleles in Chinese populations

November 4, 2020 - 10:30 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Zheng Y, Wang J, Lin M, et al.
Reference: 
Mol Genet Genomic Med. 2020 Oct 31:e1540

Although glucose‐6‐phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common inherited disorder in the Chinese population, there is scarce evidence regarding the epidemiology, evolutionary origin, and malaria‐induced positive selection effects of G6PD‐deficient alleles in various Chinese ethnic populations.

Influence of blood group, Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and Haemoglobin genotype on Falciparum malaria in children in Vihiga highland of Western Kenya

July 13, 2020 - 16:40 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Ahmed JS, Guyah B, Sang' D, Webale MK, Mufyongo NS, Munde E, Ouma C
Reference: 
BMC Infect Dis. 2020 Jul 9;20(1):487

Genetic diversity of ABO blood, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and haemoglobin type and their ability to protect against malaria vary geographically, ethnically and racially. No study has been carried out in populations resident in malaria regions in western Kenya.

G6PD and chloroquine: selecting the treatment against SARS-CoV-2

April 14, 2020 - 14:40 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Kassi EN, Papavassiliou KA, Papavassiliou AG
Reference: 
J Cell Mol Med. 2020 Apr 12

In light of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2 or COVID‐19) pandemic and the possible widespread use of chloroquine (a member of the drug class 4‐aminoquinoline primarily used to prevent and treat malaria and amebiasis) and its derivatives (e.g. hydroxychloroquine, a metabolite of chloroquine),1 a safety issue is addressed, concerning the selection of patients suitable to receive it.

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