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Sierra Leone

Are malaria transmission-blocking vaccines acceptable to high burden communities? Results from a mixed methods study in Bo, Sierra Leone

April 14, 2021 - 08:11 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Kaci D. McCoy, Caroline T. Weldon, Rashid Ansumana, Joseph M. Lamin, David A. Stenger, Sadie J. Ryan, Kevin Bardosh, Kathryn H. Jacobsen and Rhoel R. Dinglasan
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:183, 13 April 2021

Malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) could help break the cycle of malaria transmission by conferring community rather than individual protection. When introducing new intervention strategies, uptake is dependent on acceptability, not just efficacy. In this exploratory study on acceptability of TBVs in Sierra Leone, it was hypothesized that TBVs would be largely acceptable to adults and health workers in areas with relatively few ongoing malaria interventions, and that (i) knowledge of malaria and vaccines, (ii) health behaviours associated with malaria and vaccines, and (iii) attitudes towards different vaccines types could lead to greater TBV acceptability.

Comparison of capillary and venous blood for malaria detection using two PCR-based assays in febrile patients in Sierra Leone

March 10, 2021 - 14:50 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Tomasz A. Leski, Chris Rowe Taitt, David A. Stenger, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:133, 6 March 2021

Rapid and sensitive diagnostics are critical tools for clinical case management and public health control efforts. Both capillary and venous blood are currently used for malaria detection and while diagnostic technologies may not be equally sensitive with both materials, the published data on this subject are scarce and not conclusive.

Evaluation of health system readiness and coverage of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi) in Kambia district to inform national scale-up in Sierra Leone

February 8, 2021 - 10:57 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Maria Lahuerta, Roberta Sutton, Laura Steinhardt, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:74, 6 February 2021

Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is a proven strategy to protect infants against malaria. Sierra Leone is the first country to implement IPTi nationwide. IPTi implementation was evaluated in Kambia, one of two initial pilot districts, to assess quality and coverage of IPTi services.

Factors associated with access and adherence to artemisinin‐based combination therapy (ACT) for children under five: a secondary analysis of a national survey in Sierra Leone

January 27, 2021 - 11:45 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Kristin Banek, Emily L. Webb, Emily Bostick Doogue, Samuel Juana Smith, Daniel Chandramohan and Sarah G. Staedke
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:56, 21 January 2021

Access and adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) are key challenges to effective malaria treatment. A secondary analysis of the Sierra Leone malaria Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (mKAP) survey was conducted to investigate access and adherence to ACT for the treatment of fever in children under-five.

Reducing mortality from severe malaria in Sierra Leonean children by applying the World Health Organization's standard malarial protocol with additional sublingual glucose: A continuous quality improvement report

April 29, 2020 - 05:39 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Oxner A, Vellanki M, Kahn R, et al.
Reference: 
Int J Infect Dis. 2020 Apr 24. pii: S1201-9712(20)30262-9

Observational study comparing the mortality rate from malaria before and after the intervention.

Use of real-time multiplex PCR, malaria rapid diagnostic test and microscopy to investigate the prevalence of Plasmodium species among febrile hospital patients in Sierra Leone

February 25, 2020 - 15:56 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Tomasz A. Leski, Chris Rowe Taitt, David A. Stenger, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:84, 21 February 2020

Malaria continues to affect over 200 million individuals every year, especially children in Africa. Rapid and sensitive detection and identification of Plasmodium parasites is crucial for treating patients and monitoring of control efforts. Compared to traditional diagnostic methods such as microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), DNA based methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) offer significantly higher sensitivity, definitive discrimination of Plasmodium species, and detection of mixed infections. While PCR is not currently optimized for routine diagnostics, its role in epidemiological studies is increasing as the world moves closer toward regional and eventually global malaria elimination. This study demonstrates the field use of a novel, ambient temperature-stabilized, multiplexed PCR assay in a small hospital setting in Sierra Leone.

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