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bacteremia

Non-lethal Plasmodium yoelii infection drives complex patterns of Th2-type host immunity and mast cell-dependent bacteremia

September 23, 2020 - 09:09 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Céspedes N, Donnelly E, Garrison S, Haapanen L, Van De Water J, Luckhart S
Reference: 
Infect Immun. 2020 Sep 21:IAI.00427-20

Malaria strongly predisposes to bacteremia, which is associated with sequestration of parasitized red blood cells and increased gastrointestinal permeability. The mechanisms underlying this disruption are poorly understood. Here we evaluated the expression of factors associated with mast cell activation and malaria-associated bacteremia in a rodent model. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium yoelii yoelli 17XNL and blood and tissues were collected over time to assay for circulating levels of bacterial 16S DNA, IgE, mast cell protease 1 (Mcpt-1) and Mcpt-4, Th1 and Th2 cytokines as well as patterns of ileal mastocytosis and intestinal permeability.

Bacteremia in adults with severe malaria

June 8, 2020 - 15:45 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
White NJ
Reference: 
Clin Infect Dis. 2020 Jun 7:ciaa733

Symptomatic malaria is predominantly a disease of childhood in areas of higher transmission (i.e. much of sub-Saharan Africa). Most cases of severe malaria occur in children less than 5 years of age. In these regions both malaria and sepsis are major causes of childhood death, yet the clinical distinction between the two is difficult, particularly if there is no obvious focus of infection. Furthermore, severe malaria predisposes to bacterial infections, particularly with Salmonella sp, so a very sick child  may have both.

NOT Open Access | High Circulation of Malaria and Low Prevalence of Bacteremia in Febrile and Afebrile Children in Northeastern Gabon

January 20, 2020 - 14:35 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Boumbanda Koyo CS, Oyegue-Liabagui SL, Mediannikov O, Cortaredona S, Kouna LC, Raoult D, Lekana-Douki JB, Fenollar F
Reference: 
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 102, Issue 1, 8 Jan 2020, p. 121 - 129

The epidemiology of febrile illness etiologies is under-explored in resource-poor settings. Establishing a local repertory of microorganisms circulating in blood of febrile and afebrile people is important for physicians. Blood was collected from 428 febrile and 88 afebrile children in Makokou (Gabon) and analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. Plasmodium spp. were the pathogens, which were most detected in febrile children (69.6%; 298/428) and in afebrile children (31.8%; 28/88) (P < 0.0001).

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