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Mothers

A longitudinal study of plasma BAFF levels in mothers and their infants in Uganda, and correlations with subsets of B cells

January 20, 2021 - 07:03 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Rönnberg C, Lugaajju A, Nyman A, Hammar U, Bottai M, Lautenbach MJ, Sundling C, Kironde F, Persson KEM
Reference: 
PLoS One. 2021 Jan 19;16(1):e0245431

Malaria is a potentially life-threatening disease with approximately half of the world's population at risk. Young children and pregnant women are hit hardest by the disease. B cells and antibodies are part of an adaptive immune response protecting individuals continuously exposed to the parasite. An infection with Plasmodium falciparum can cause dysregulation of B cell homeostasis, while antibodies are known to be key in controlling symptoms and parasitemia. BAFF is an instrumental cytokine for the development and maintenance of B cells.

Rural–urban disparities and factors associated with delayed care-seeking and testing for malaria before medication use by mothers of under-five children, Igabi LGA, Kaduna Nigeria

August 19, 2020 - 09:30 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Obafemi J. Babalola, Olufemi Ajumobi and IkeOluwapo O. Ajayi
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:294, 18 August 2020

Fever in under-five children (U5) is the commonest presenting complaint in general practice and mothers’ recognition is an entry point for fever treatment, including malaria. This study describes rural–urban disparity in fever prevalence in U5, mothers’ malaria knowledge, care-seeking, testing for malaria before anti-malarial medication and the associated factors.

NOT Open Access | Congenital Malaria in Newborns Delivered to Mothers with Malaria-Infected Placenta in Blue Nile State, Sudan

August 3, 2020 - 15:43 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Omer SA, Adam I, Noureldien A, Elhaj H, Guerrero-Latorre L, Silgado A, Sulleiro E, Molina I
Reference: 
J Trop Pediatr. 2020 Aug 1;66(4):428-434

Diagnosis of congenital malaria is complicated by the low density of the parasite circulating in the cord blood and/or the peripheral blood of the newborns. Molecular techniques are significantly more sensitive than blood smears in detecting low-level parasitemia. This study investigated the prevalence of congenital malaria by the use of the real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) in 102 babies born to mothers with microscopically confirmed infected placenta from Blue Nile state, Sudan.

NOT Open Access | Congenital Malaria in Newborns Delivered to Mothers with Malaria-Infected Placenta in Blue Nile State, Sudan

January 24, 2020 - 14:57 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Omer SA, Adam I, Noureldien A, Elhaj H, Guerrero-Latorre L, Silgado A, Sulleiro E, Molina I
Reference: 
Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, fmz083

Diagnosis of congenital malaria is complicated by the low density of the parasite circulating in the cord blood and/or the peripheral blood of the newborns. Molecular techniques are significantly more sensitive than blood smears in detecting low-level parasitemia. This study investigated the prevalence of congenital malaria by the use of the real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) in 102 babies born to mothers with microscopically confirmed infected placenta from Blue Nile state, Sudan.

Malaria Antigen Shedding in the Breast Milk of Mothers From a Region With Endemic Malaria

January 14, 2020 - 16:17 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
van den Elsen LWJ, Verhasselt V, Egwang T
Reference: 
JAMA Pediatrics, 2020 Jan 6

More than 200 million cases of malaria occur yearly, with most in Africa, where infants younger than 5 years account for two-thirds of all malaria deaths.1 This highlights the need for successful prevention of malaria infection, especially in early life. Breastfeeding is the most efficient way to prevent child morbidity and mortality attributable to respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infectious diseases.

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