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climate change

Open Access | Transmission Intensity and Drug Resistance in Malaria Population Dynamics: Implications for Climate Change

October 30, 2010 - 12:39 -- Kabogo Ndegwa
Author(s): 
Yael Artzy-Randrup, David Alonso, Mercedes Pascual
Reference: 
PLoS ONE 5(10): e13588

Although the spread of drug resistance and the influence of climate change on malaria are most often considered separately, these factors have the potential to interact through altered levels of transmission intensity.

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Open Access | Relevant microclimate for determining the development rate of malaria mosquitoes and possible implications of climate change

July 12, 2010 - 13:53 -- Kabogo Ndegwa
Author(s): 
Paaijmans KP, Imbahale SS, Thomas MB, Takken W
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2010, 9:196 (9 July 2010)

Existing models will tend to underestimate mosquito population growth under current conditions, and may overestimate relative increases in population growth under future climate change. These results highlight the need for better integration of biological and environmental information at the scale relevant to mosquito biology.

Open Access | Modeling the effects of weather and climate change on malaria transmission

May 10, 2010 - 09:34 -- Kabogo Ndegwa
Author(s): 
PE Parham, E Michael
Reference: 
Environ Health Perspect 118:620-626

Disease emergence, extinction, and transmission all depend strongly on climate. Mathematical models offer powerful tools for understanding geographic shifts in incidence as climate changes. Nonlinear dependences of transmission on climate necessitates consideration of both changing climate trends and variability across time scales of interest.

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Open Access | Bayesian modelling of the effect of climate on malaria in Burundi

April 30, 2010 - 07:42 -- Kabogo Ndegwa
Author(s): 
Nkurunziza H, Gebhardt A, Pilz J
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2010, 9:114 (29 April 2010)

The results obtained from the proposed models are discussed and it is found that malaria incidence in a given month in Burundi is strongly positively associated with the minimum temperature of the previous month. In contrast, it is found that rainfall and maximum temperature in a given month have a possible negative effect on malaria incidence of the same month.

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