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anopheles farauti

Smallest Anopheles farauti occur during the peak transmission season in the Solomon Islands

June 24, 2019 - 16:05 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Kimberley McLaughlin, Tanya L. Russell, Allan Apairamo, Hugo Bugoro, Jance Oscar, Robert D. Cooper, Nigel W. Beebe, Scott A. Ritchie and Thomas R. Burkot
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2019 18:208, 24 June 2019

Malaria transmission varies in intensity amongst Solomon Island villages where Anopheles farauti is the only vector. This variation in transmission intensity might be explained by density-dependent processes during An. farauti larval development, as density dependence can impact adult size with associated fitness costs and daily survivorship.

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Mapping a Plasmodium transmission spatial suitability index in Solomon Islands: a malaria monitoring and control tool

October 23, 2018 - 15:08 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Isabelle Jeanne, Lynda E. Chambers, Amanda Amjadali, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2018 17:381, 22 October 2018

The TSI model developed here provides useful predictions of likely malaria transmission larval sources based on the environmental preferences of the mosquito, An. farauti.

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Larval habitats of the Anopheles farauti and Anopheles lungae complexes in the Solomon Islands

March 16, 2016 - 17:54 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Tanya L. Russell, Thomas R. Burkot, Hugo Bugoro, Allan Apairamo, Nigel W. Beebe, Weng K. Chow, Robert D. Cooper, Frank H. Collins and Neil F. Lobo
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2016 15:164, 15 March 2016

The only documented major malaria vector collected in larval surveys in both Central and Western Provinces was An. farauti.

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Determinants of host feeding success by Anopheles farauti

March 15, 2016 - 18:15 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Tanya L. Russell, Nigel W. Beebe, Hugo Bugoro, Allan Apairamo, Robert D. Cooper, Frank H. Collins, Neil F. Lobo and Thomas R. Burkot
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2016 15:152, 10 March 2016

One of the strongest drivers for host species preference was the relative abundance of the different host species.

Frequent blood feeding enables insecticide-treated nets to reduce transmission by mosquitoes that bite predominately outdoors

March 15, 2016 - 18:13 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Tanya L. Russell, Nigel W. Beebe, Hugo Bugoro, Allan Apairamo, Weng K. Chow, Robert D. Cooper, Frank H. Collins, Neil F. Lobo and Thomas R. Burkot
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2016 15:156, 10 March 2016

The short duration of the feeding cycle by this species offers an explanation for the substantial control of malaria that has been achieved in the Solomon Islands by LLINs and IRS.

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Anopheles farauti is a homogeneous population that blood feeds early and outdoors in the Solomon Islands

March 15, 2016 - 18:10 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Tanya L. Russell, Nigel W. Beebe, Hugo Bugoro, Allan Apairamo, Frank H. Collins, Robert D. Cooper, Neil F. Lobo and Thomas R. Burkot
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2016 15:151, 9 March 2016

The finding that An. farauti is a homogeneous population is significant, because during the multiple feeding cycles required to complete the extrinsic incubation period, many individual female anophelines will enter houses late at night and be exposed to the insecticides used in LLINs or IRS.

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