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insecticide resistance

The making of a PNAS paper...here's our story

September 3, 2015 - 20:35 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Once a scientific paper is published online and you can download a pdf of it, this addictive and magnificent feeling gets on to you. This is the fruit of all the hard work: first to get the funding to undertake the research, then the hard work to actually perform all the research, then the hard work to write up the manuscript, then the submission, the reviews, the rebuttal, and eventually acceptance followed by proof reading and then publication. The route from thinking up research to publishing about it is long, tedious, and really hard work. But why don't we ever talk about this route? Why do we publish our papers but don't tell our peers more about how we got there? The fun parts, the sweat and tears, or even the fights? This week we published an article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS; attached below). And here's the story you don't know when you read the paper...

Anopheles bionomics, insecticide resistance and malaria transmission in southwest Burkina Faso: A pre-intervention study

August 5, 2020 - 14:13 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Soma DD, Zogo BM, Somé A, Tchiekoi BN, et al.
Reference: 
PLoS ONE 15(8): e0236920

Twenty-seven villages were selected in southwest Burkina Faso to implement new vector control strategies in addition to long lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) through a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT). We conducted entomological surveys in the villages during the dry cold season (January 2017), dry hot season (March 2017) and rainy season (June 2017) to describe malaria vectors bionomics, insecticide resistance and transmission prior to this trial.

Evolution of insecticide resistance and its mechanisms in Anopheles stephensi in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region

July 20, 2020 - 15:25 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Ahmadali Enayati, Ahmad Ali Hanafi-Bojd, Mohammad Mehdi Sedaghat, Morteza Zaim and Janet Hemingway
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:258, 17 July 2020

While Iran is on the path to eliminating malaria, the disease with 4.9 million estimated cases and 9300 estimated deaths in 2018 remains a serious health problem in the World Health Organization (WHO) Eastern Mediterranean Region. Anopheles stephensi is the main malaria vector in Iran and its range extends from Iraq to western China. Recently, the vector invaded new territories in Sri Lanka and countries in the Horn of Africa. Insecticide resistance in An. stephensi is a potential issue in controlling the spread of this vector.

NOT Open Access | Insecticide resistance and malaria control: A genetics-epidemiology modeling approach

July 13, 2020 - 15:49 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Mohammed-Awel J, Iboi EA, Gumel AB
Reference: 
Math Biosci. 2020 Jul;325:108368

Malaria, a deadly infectious disease caused by the protozoan Plasmodium, remains a major public health menace affecting at least half the human race. Although the large-scale usage of insecticides-based control measures, notably long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS), have led to a dramatic reduction of the burden of this global scourge between the period 2000 to 2015, the fact that the malaria vector (adult female Anopheles mosquito) has become resistant to all currently-available insecticides potentially makes the current laudable global effort to eradicate malaria by 2040 more challenging.

NOT Open Access | Potential Roles of Environmental and Socio-Economic Factors in the Distribution of Insecticide Resistance in Anopheles gambiae sensu lato (Culicidae: Diptera) Across Togo, West Africa

July 6, 2020 - 16:36 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Ahadji-Dabla KM, Romero-Alvarez D, Djègbè I, Amoudji AD, Apétogbo GY, Djouaka R, Oboussoumi K, Aawi A, Atcha-Oubou T, Peterson AT, Ketoh GK
Reference: 
Journal of Medical Entomology, Volume 57, Issue 4, July 2020, Pages 1168–1175

Vector control strategies recommended by the World Health Organization are threatened by resistance of Anopheles mosquitoes to insecticides. Information on the distribution of resistant genotypes of malaria vectors is increasingly needed to address the problem. Ten years of published and unpublished data on malaria vector susceptibility/resistance and resistance genes have been collected across Togo.

Mapping trends in insecticide resistance phenotypes in African malaria vectors

June 29, 2020 - 16:10 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Hancock PA, Hendriks CJM, Tangena JA, Gibson H, Hemingway J, Coleman M, Gething PW, Cameron E, Bhatt S, Moyes CL
Reference: 
PLoS Biol. 2020 Jun 25; 18(6):e3000633

Mitigating the threat of insecticide resistance in African malaria vector populations requires comprehensive information about where resistance occurs, to what degree, and how this has changed over time. Estimating these trends is complicated by the sparse, heterogeneous distribution of observations of resistance phenotypes in field populations.

NOT Open Access | Isolation and transcriptomic analysis of Anopheles gambiae oenocytes enables the delineation of hydrocarbon biosynthesis

June 17, 2020 - 12:51 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Grigoraki L, Grau-Bové X, Carrington Yates H, Lycett GJ, Ranson H
Reference: 
Elife. 2020 Jun 15;9:e58019

The surface of insects is coated in cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs); variations in the composition of this layer affect a range of traits including adaptation to arid environments and defence against pathogens and toxins. In the African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae quantitative and qualitative variance in CHC composition have been associated with speciation, ecological habitat and insecticide resistance.

An Africa-wide genomic evolution of insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus involves selective sweeps, copy number variations, gene conversion and transposons

June 8, 2020 - 14:50 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Weedall GD, Riveron JM, Hearn J, Irving H, Kamdem C, Fouet C, White BJ, Wondji CS
Reference: 
PLoS Genet 16(6): e1008822

Insecticide resistance in malaria vectors threatens to reverse recent gains in malaria control. Deciphering patterns of gene flow and resistance evolution in malaria vectors is crucial to improve control strategies and preventing malaria resurgence. A genome-wide survey of Anopheles funestus genetic diversity Africa-wide revealed evidences of a major division between southern Africa and elsewhere, associated with different population histories.

'What I cannot create, I do not understand': functionally validated synergism of metabolic and target site insecticide resistance

May 27, 2020 - 10:39 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Samantsidis GR, Panteleri R, Denecke S, Kounadi S, Christou I, Nauen R, Douris V, Vontas J
Reference: 
Proc Biol Sci. 2020 May 27;287(1927):20200838

The putative synergistic action of target-site mutations and enhanced detoxification in pyrethroid resistance in insects has been hypothesized as a major evolutionary mechanism responsible for dramatic consequences in malaria incidence and crop production. Combining genetic transformation and CRISPR/Cas9 genome modification, we generated transgenic Drosophila lines expressing pyrethroid metabolizing P450 enzymes in a genetic background along with engineered mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel (para) known to confer target-site resistance.

Insecticide resistance in Anopheles stephensi in Somali Region, eastern Ethiopia

May 12, 2020 - 16:42 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Solomon Yared, Araya Gebressielasie, Lambodhar Damodaran, Victoria Bonnell, Karen Lopez, Daniel Janies and Tamar E. Carter
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:180, 12 May 2020

The movement of malaria vectors into new areas is a growing concern in the efforts to control malaria. The recent report of Anopheles stephensi in eastern Ethiopia has raised the necessity to understand the insecticide resistance status of the vector in the region to better inform vector-based interventions. The aim of this study was to evaluate insecticide resistance in An. stephensi in eastern Ethiopia using two approaches: (1) World Health Organization (WHO) bioassay tests in An. stephensi; and (2) genetic analysis of insecticide resistance genes in An. stephensi in eastern Ethiopia.

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