The world's scientific and social network for malaria professionals
Subscribe to free Newsletter | 10730 malaria professionals are enjoying the free benefits of MalariaWorld today

anopheles cruzii

A mathematical model for zoonotic transmission of malaria in the Atlantic Forest: Exploring the effects of variations in vector abundance and acrodendrophily

February 17, 2021 - 09:23 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Medeiros-Sousa AR, Laporta GZ, Coutinho RM, Mucci LF, Marrelli MT
Reference: 
PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2021 Feb 16;15(2):e0008736

Transmission foci of autochthonous malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax-like parasites have frequently been reported in the Atlantic Forest in Southeastern and Southern Brazil. Evidence suggests that malaria is a zoonosis in these areas as human infections by simian Plasmodium species have been detected, and the main vector of malaria in the Atlantic Forest, Anopheles (Kerteszia) cruzii, can blood feed on human and simian hosts.

The influence of anthropogenic habitat fragmentation on the genetic structure and diversity of the malaria vector Anopheles cruzii (Diptera: Culicidae)

October 28, 2020 - 08:40 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Multini LC, de Souza ALDS, Marrelli MT, Wilke ABB
Reference: 
Sci Rep. 2020 Oct 22;10(1):18018

Fragmentation of natural environments as a result of human interference has been associated with a decrease in species richness and increase in abundance of a few species that have adapted to these environments. The Brazilian Atlantic Forest, which has been undergoing an intense process of fragmentation and deforestation caused by human-made changes to the environment, is an important hotspot for malaria transmission.

Altitudinal population structure and microevolution of the malaria vector Anopheles cruzii

December 17, 2014 - 17:04 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Camila Lorenz, Tatiani C Marques, Maria AM Sallum, Lincoln Suesdek
Reference: 
Parasites & Vectors 2014, 7:581 (16 December 2014)

We explored the homogeneity of the An. cruzii population across its altitudinal range of distribution using wing shape and mtDNA gene analysis. We also assessed the stability of wing geometry over time.

Subscribe to RSS - anopheles cruzii