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resistance

Research: Persistence of markers of chloroquine resistance among P. falciparum isolates recovered from two Nigerian communities

February 27, 2014 - 22:36 -- Ingeborg van Schayk
Author(s): 
Yetunde A. Olukosi, Muyiwa K. Oyebola, Olusola Ajibaye, Bassey A. Orok, Olugbenga O. Aina, Chimere O. Agomo, Bamidele A. Iwalokun, Samuel K. Akindele, Veronica N.V. Enya, Hilary I. Okoh
Reference: 
MWJ 2014, 5, 3

We investigated the prevalence of the major markers of chloroquine resistance years after the withdrawal of the drug in Nigeria.
 Finger prick blood samples were collected from participants presenting with symptoms of malaria in Lagos, Nigeria.

Can we maintain effectiveness of the tools?

May 17, 2012 - 12:30 -- Bart G.J. Knols

This week WHO reiterated the fragility of the gains the world has made over the last decade through intense deployment of vector control in the fight against malaria. Reuters published an online article on the matter titled 'Insecticide resistance threatens malaria fight'. In it, WHO Director General, Margaret Chan, warns of the seriousness of the situation in Africa and India. Apparently, in ever more places the toolbox, filled with four classes of chemicals, is gradually emptying.

Waking up in the face of resistance?

July 7, 2011 - 15:54 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Sometimes you come across articles that blow your mind. You read them and feel your heartbeat increasing. Each sentence you finish makes you wonder more what is going on here. What the politics are, who's really behind it, and what the goal of it is....

ACTs: What will happen when the cat gets out of the bag?

April 11, 2011 - 20:47 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Most of us that have worked in the field of malaria for a few decades have gone through periods where we suddenly noticed changes in drug policy. When chloroquine was replaced by sulfadoxine-pyremethamine as a first-line drug, later to be replaced by artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs).

But the world is now faced with a new challenge. That of preventing artemisinin resistance from escaping south-east Asia. Without anything to replace it (yet), this is a looming catastrophe, according to Joel Breman in an interview with TropIKA.net. It may still be confined to the Thai-Cambodia border, although nobody really nows have far it has spread.

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