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severe malaria

NOT Open Access | Delayed iron does not alter cognition or behavior among children with severe malaria and iron deficiency

May 14, 2020 - 12:28 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Ssemata AS, Hickson M, Ssenkusu JM, Cusick SE, Nakasujja N, Opoka RO, Kroupina M, Georgieff MK, Bangirana P, John CC
Reference: 
Pediatr Res. 2020 May 13

Malaria and iron deficiency (ID) in childhood are both associated with cognitive and behavioral dysfunction. The current standard of care for children with malaria and ID is concurrent antimalarial and iron therapy. Delaying iron therapy until inflammation subsides could increase iron absorption but also impair cognition.

Management of Travel-Related Infectious Diseases in the Emergency Department

May 12, 2020 - 16:50 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Throckmorton L, Hancher J
Reference: 
Curr Emerg Hosp Med Rep. 2020 May 6:1-10

Emergency physicians generally have limited exposure to internationally acquired illnesses. However, travelers can present quite ill, and delays in recognition and treatment can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. This paper aims to summarize typical presentations of common international diseases and provide the emergency physician with a practical approach based on current guidelines.

A common polymorphism in the mechanosensitive ion channel PIEZO1 is associated with protection from severe malaria in humans

April 20, 2020 - 08:51 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Christian N. Nguetse, Natasha Purington, Emily R. Ebel, Bikash Shakya, Marilou Tetard, Peter G. Kremsner, Thirumalaisamy P. Velavan, and Elizabeth S. Egan
Reference: 
PNAS April 7, 2020

Malaria caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum has served as a strong evolutionary force throughout human history, selecting for red blood cell polymorphisms that confer innate protection against severe disease. Recently, gain-of-function mutations in the mechanosensitive ion channel PIEZO1 were shown to ameliorate Plasmodium parasite growth, blood–brain barrier dysfunction, and mortality in a mouse model of malaria. In humans, the gain-of-function allele PIEZO1 E756del is highly prevalent and enriched in Africans, raising the possibility that it is under positive selection due to malaria.

A common polymorphism in the mechanosensitive ion channel PIEZO1 is associated with protection from severe malaria in humans

April 13, 2020 - 13:57 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Nguetse CN, Purington N, Ebel ER, Shakya B, Tetard M, Kremsner PG, Velavan TP, Egan ES
Reference: 
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020 Apr 7. pii: 201919843

Malaria caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum has served as a strong evolutionary force throughout human history, selecting for red blood cell polymorphisms that confer innate protection against severe disease. Recently, gain-of-function mutations in the mechanosensitive ion channel PIEZO1 were shown to ameliorate Plasmodium parasite growth, blood–brain barrier dysfunction, and mortality in a mouse model of malaria.

Not Open Access | Optimizing iron supplementation for children with severe malaria

March 10, 2020 - 16:26 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Suchdev PS, Trehan I
Reference: 
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, nqaa041

The safe and efficacious provision of iron supplementation in areas of high infectious disease burden is a critical and sometimes controversial global health issue. Iron deficiency anemia remains the leading cause of years lived with disability in much of sub-Saharan Africa, so improvements in anemia control programs are needed, including ensuring that iron supplementation is safely and optimally administered in settings of high infection burden.

Changes in the clinical presentation and outcomes of patients treated for severe malaria in a referral French university intensive care unit from 2004 to 2017

February 17, 2020 - 14:41 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Jordane L, Bruno M, Jean-François T, et al.
Reference: 
Ann Intensive Care. 2020 Feb 12;10(1):21

In France, the incidence of severe imported malaria cases increased since early 2000. Artesunate was available (temporarily use authorization) since mid-2011 in France and commonly used for severe malaria since early 2013. Thus, the study objectives were to describe the patients with severe imported malaria admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) and assess the changes in clinical presentation and outcomes before and after this date.

NOT Open Access | Treatment of Severe Malaria in the United States

February 17, 2020 - 12:22 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
John CC
Reference: 
Ann Intern Med. 2020 Feb 4;172(3):224-225

The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) shares Krey and Travassos' (1) concerns about treatment of severe malaria in the United States.

Delayed haemolysis after treatment with intravenous artesunate in patients with severe malaria in India

January 27, 2020 - 13:29 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Deepali Savargaonkar, Manoj Kumar Das, Amar Verma, Jeevan K. Mitra, C. P. Yadav, Bina Srivastava, Anupkumar R. Anvikar and Neena Valecha
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:39, 22 January 2020

Parenteral artesunate is the treatment of choice for severe malaria. It is safe, efficacious and well tolerated anti-malarial. However, delayed haemolysis has been reported in travellers, non-immune individuals and in African children.

Platelet α-granules contribute to organ-specific pathologies in a mouse model of severe malaria

January 22, 2020 - 17:15 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Darling TK, Schenk MP, Zhou CC, Maloba FM, Mimche PN, Gibbins JM, Jobe SM, Lamb TJ
Reference: 
Blood Advances, Volume 4, Issue 1 January 14 2020

Cerebral malaria and malaria-associated acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome areamong the most severe complications ofPlasmodiuminfection. While these disease manifestations aremultifactorial, platelets have been described to play a role in the development of both syndromes inhumans1,2and mice.3,4Although the impact of platelets on malaria has been well studied, questionsremain with regard to their contribution to parasite control and immunopathogenesis.

Advocating an attack against severe malaria: a cost-effectiveness analysis

January 14, 2020 - 12:08 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Greenhalgh S, Chandwani V
Reference: 
BMC Public Health 2020 Jan 7; 20(1):17

A recent study found that the gut microbiota, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, have the ability to modulate the severity of malaria. The modulation of the severity of malaria is not however, the typical focal point of most widespread interventions. Thus, an essential element of information required before serious consideration of any intervention that targets reducing severe malaria incidence is a prediction of the health benefits and costs required to be cost-effective.

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