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vector research

Current vector research challenges in the greater Mekong subregion for dengue, Malaria, and Other Vector-Borne Diseases: A report from a multisectoral workshop March 2019

August 3, 2020 - 15:40 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Christofferson RC, Parker DM, Overgaard HJ, Hii J, Devine G, Wilcox BA, Nam VS, Abubakar S, Boyer S, Boonnak K, Whitehead SS, Huy R, Rithea L, Sochantha T, Wellems TE, Valenzuela JG, Manning JE
Reference: 
PLoS Negl Trop Dis 14(7): e0008302

Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) are a significant and growing threat to the health of the 326 million people living in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) (Fig 1). The GMS is a diverse landscape of cities, rural agricultural communities, forests, deltas, wooded hills, and mountains in the six countries along the Mekong River basin.

Cinderella science

December 1, 2012 - 14:43 -- Bart G.J. Knols

The guest blog below was contributed by Prof. Matt Thomas, of Penn State University. Read more about Professor Thomas here.

Everybody would like to see the burden of malaria reduced and while there might be some disciplinary biases, most would agree that long-term sustainable management of malaria requires integrated strategies built on solid foundations of local knowledge and capacity. 
 
Of the broad approaches available (and by available I include potential tools somewhere along the development pipeline), vector control is clearly pivotal. This is not to diminish the importance of other technologies, such as drugs or diagnostics, but much of the recent decline in malaria can be attributed to wide-scale implementation of vector control tools such as long lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) and indoor residual insecticide sprays (IRS). Furthermore, in nearly every historical case where malaria has been substantially reduced or locally eliminated, vector control has been key. 

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