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arabiensis

Single blinded semi-field evaluation of MAÏA® topical repellent ointment compared to unformulated 20% DEET against Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles arabiensis and Aedes aegypti in Tanzania

January 9, 2021 - 12:13 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Emmanuel Mbuba, Olukayode G. Odufuwa, Frank C. Tenywa, Rose Philipo, Mgeni M. Tambwe, Johnson K. Swai, Jason D. Moore and Sarah J. Moore
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2021 20:12, 6 January 2021

N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) topical mosquito repellents are effective personal protection tools. However, DEET-based repellents tend to have low consumer acceptability because they are cosmetically unappealing. More attractive formulations are needed to encourage regular user compliance. This study evaluated the protective efficacy and protection duration of a new topical repellent ointment containing 15% DEET, MAÏA® compared to 20% DEET in ethanol using malaria and dengue mosquito vectors in Bagamoyo Tanzania.

Reduced human-biting preferences of the African malaria vectors Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae in an urban context: controlled, competitive host-preference experiments in Tanzania

November 24, 2020 - 13:49 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Yeromin P. Mlacha, Prosper P. Chaki, Athuman Muhili, Dennis J. Massue, Marcel Tanner, Silas Majambere, Gerry F. Killen and Nicodem J. Govella
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:418, 20 November 2020

Host preference is a critical determinant of human exposure to vector-borne infections and the impact of vector control interventions. Widespread use of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) across sub-Saharan Africa, which protect humans against mosquitoes, may select for altered host preference traits of malaria vectors over the long term. Here, the host preferences of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (s.s.) were experimentally assessed in the field, using direct host-preference assays in two distinct ecological settings in Tanzania.

Comparative assessment of insecticide resistance phenotypes in two major malaria vectors, Anopheles funestus and Anopheles arabiensis in south-eastern Tanzania

November 14, 2020 - 16:00 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Polius G. Pinda, Claudia Eichenberger, Halfan S. Ngowo, Dickson S. Msaky, Said Abbasi, Japhet Kihonda, Hamis Bwanaly and Fredros O. Okumu
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:408, 11 November 2020

Long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) have greatly reduced malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa, but are threatened by insecticide resistance. In south-eastern Tanzania, pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles funestus are now implicated in > 80% of malaria infections, even in villages where the species occurs at lower densities than the other vector, Anopheles arabiensis. This study compared the insecticide resistance phenotypes between the two malaria vectors in an area where pyrethroid-LLINs are widely used.

NOT Open Access | Disease Vector Relative Spatio-Temporal Abundances to Water Bodies and Thermal Fitness Across Malaria Endemic Semi-Arid Areas

October 28, 2020 - 10:33 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Buxton M, Wasserman RJ, Nyamukondiwa C
Reference: 
J Med Entomol. 2020 Oct 27:tjaa221

The biophysical environment plays an important role in the spatio-temporal abundance and distribution of mosquitoes. This has implications for the spread of vectors and diseases they cause across diverse landscapes. Here, we assessed vector mosquito abundances in relation to large water bodies, from three malaria districts in a semi-arid environment.

Not Open Access | New distribution record of Anopheles rivulorum-like from Sadiola, Mali, with notes on malaria vector insecticide resistance

October 28, 2020 - 09:28 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Wragge SE, Venter N, Touré D, Hunt RH, Coetzee M
Reference: 
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2020 Oct 22:traa113

The SEMOS gold mine in Sadiola, southwestern Mali, has been implementing a malaria vector control programme for 15 y using indoor residual house spraying and sporadic larval control. Periodic screening of the vector populations have been carried out over the years to provide information to the control programme, mainly on vector species present and their insecticide resistance status. The data from five entomological surveys, carried out in 2006, 2011, 2014, 2016 and 2018, are presented.

First report of Anopheles (Cellia) multicolor during a study of tolerance to salinity of Anopheles arabiensis larvae in Nouakchott, Mauritania

October 21, 2020 - 08:21 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Ould Lemrabott MA, Le Goff G, Kengne P, Ndiaye O, Costantini C, Mint Lekweiry K, Ould Ahmedou Salem MS, Robert V, Basco L, Simard F, Ould Mohamed Salem Boukhary A
Reference: 
Parasit Vectors. 2020 Oct 16;13(1):522

Anopheles multicolor is known to be present in the arid areas of Africa north of the Sahara Desert, especially in oases. To date, its presence in Mauritania has not been reported. Here, we present the first record of its presence in Nouakchott, the capital of Mauritania. The larvae of An. multicolor, together with those of An. arabiensis, the major malaria vector in the city, were found thriving in highly saline surface water collections.

Differential contribution of Anopheles coustani and Anopheles arabiensis to the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in two neighbouring villages of Madagascar

August 27, 2020 - 08:17 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Goupeyou-Youmsi J, Rakotondranaivo T, Puchot N, Peterson I, Girod R, Vigan-Womas I, Paul R, Ndiath MO, Bourgouin C
Reference: 
Parasit Vectors. 2020 Aug 26;13(1):430

Malaria is still a heavy public health concern in Madagascar. Few studies combining parasitology and entomology have been conducted despite the need for accurate information to design effective vector control measures. In a Malagasy region of moderate to intense transmission of both Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax, parasitology and entomology have been combined to survey malaria transmission in two nearby villages.

NOT Open Access | Male swarming aggregation pheromones increase female attraction and mating success among multiple African malaria vector mosquito species

August 5, 2020 - 14:33 -- NOT Open Access
Author(s): 
Mozūraitis R, Hajkazemian M, Zawada JW, Szymczak J, Pålsson K, Sekar V, Biryukova I, Friedländer MR, Koekemoer LL, Baird JK, Borg-Karlson AK, Emami SN
Reference: 
Nat Ecol Evol. 2020 Aug 3

Accumulating behavioural data indicate that aggregation pheromones may mediate the formation and maintenance of mosquito swarms. However, chemical cues possibly luring mosquitoes to swarms have not been adequately investigated, and the likely molecular incitants of these complex reproductive behaviours remain unknown. Here we show that males of the important malaria vector species Anopheles arabiensis and An. gambiae produce and release aggregation pheromones that attract individuals to the swarm and enhance mating success.

Quantifying flight aptitude variation in wild Anopheles gambiae in order to identify long-distance migrants

July 22, 2020 - 15:47 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Roy Faiman, Alpha S. Yaro, Tovi Lehmann, et al.
Reference: 
Malaria Journal 2020 19:263, 22 July 2020

In the West African Sahel, mosquito reproduction is halted during the 5–7 month-long dry season, due to the absence of surface waters required for larval development. However, recent studies have suggested that both Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (s.s.) and Anopheles arabiensis repopulate this region via migration from distant locations where larval sites are perennial. Anopheles coluzzii engages in more regional migration, presumably within the Sahel, following shifting resources correlating with the ever-changing patterns of Sahelian rainfall. Understanding mosquito migration is key to controlling malaria—a disease that continues to claim more than 400,000 lives annually, especially those of African children. Using tethered flight data of wild mosquitoes, the distribution of flight parameters were evaluated as indicators of long-range migrants versus appetitive flyers, and the species specific seasonal differences and gonotrophic states compared between two flight activity modalities. Morphometrical differences were evaluated in the wings of mosquitoes exhibiting high flight activity (HFA) vs. low flight activity (LFA).

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