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CLOSED: Job: Reminder & deadline postponed: Postdoctoral Research Scientist

May 16, 2010 - 20:05 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

Applications are invited for a Postdoctoral Research scientist to work on a project funded by the FCT (National Scientific Foundation), Portugal to investigate the role of immune stimulatory molecules on mosquito Anopheles gambiae response against the malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei (PTDC/SAU-MII/102596/2008). 

Sustaining malaria control in Africa

April 7, 2010 - 14:30 -- William Jobin

The current enthusiasm for malaria control in Africa will bring us much closer to our goal if we build on the successes of the past, and avoid repeating the mistakes. The major mistake in the global Malaria Eradication Program of 1955 was to embark on an unsustainable strategy, which collapsed within a decade. We need to ensure that current strategies do not repeat this mistake.

What's this TH!NK3 all about?

March 30, 2010 - 20:59 -- Bart G.J. Knols

'TH!NK3: Developing world' is the third round of the European Journalism Centre's widely acclaimed international blogging competition series. The participants of TH!NK3 (called "TH!NKers") are journalism students, academics and experts from 27 EU Member States, neighbourhood countries and beyond.

Climate & malaria

March 22, 2010 - 13:51 -- Sander Koenraadt

These days, not only scientists are debating about the existence and potential impact of climate change. Since the mishaps in the fourth assessment report of the IPCC were revealed and received enormous media exposure, even my parents in law (non-scientists) have been asking me about it. Now I wonder when my 3-year old daughter will start casting doubts…

'Breakthrough' of the week: Flying syringes

March 19, 2010 - 12:29 -- Bart G.J. Knols

In the early 1990s, when scientists first came up with a radical new idea to engineer mosquitoes that would no longer be capable of transmitting pathogens, some thought of an even more fantastic application. Use mosquitoes to vaccinate people. Silence followed until now...

E-interview with Dr. Vincent Corbel (Benin, 1976)

March 19, 2010 - 10:19 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Dr. Corbel is currently a senior researcher at IRD, and based at the CREC in Cotonou in Benin. Following five years of heading the WHO collaborating centre for the evaluation of new public health pesticides he moved to Benin where he undertakes highly interesting studies aimed at improving vector control across Africa.

Write about malaria: But only if you are a UK citizen!

March 14, 2010 - 22:25 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Now that we're reaching the end of the first decade in which the world focused on the Millenium Development Goals, it is time to look both back and forward. Several competitions have been set up to get both amateur and professional journalists interested in writing about the failures and successes so far, including malaria. But the Guardian has a special way of doing this...

E-interview with Dr. Raphael N'Guessan (Ivory Coast, 1964)

March 7, 2010 - 10:34 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Raphael N’Guessan is a Medical Entomologist and West Africa IVCC programme manager based in Benin. His current research interests are on malaria vector control, with particular emphasis on control of resistant vectors, insecticide resistance management, and investigation of alternative strategies for its delay.

 

Q: Dear Raphael, please tell us what the main focus of your work is, and why this is important within the framework of malaria control and elimination.

E-interview with Dr. Gunilla Priebe: Should more malaria research be based in Africa?

March 1, 2010 - 08:25 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Dr. Gunilla Priebe recently graduated from the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) on a most interesting topic. She advocates further Africanisation of malaria research based on her study of the Multilateral Initiative on Malaria. Some questions for Gunilla... 

 

 Question/Bart: If you argue for more research in the South, then what should the role of scientists in the North be(come)?...

E-interview with Fredros Okumu (Kenya, 1981)

February 21, 2010 - 12:47 -- Bart G.J. Knols

E-interviews are a new section on MalariaWorld, where we interview members about their work and role in the field of malaria. This is our first e-interview, with Mr. Fredros Okumu, working at the Ifakara Health Institute in Tanzania and PhD student at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

 

Question/Bart: Fredros, what are you currently working on and why is this important?

Will laser technology rid Africa of malaria?

February 16, 2010 - 12:11 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Last week, Nathan Myhrvold, a former Microsoft executive, presented a fascinating new invention to the world during a talk at the TED conference. The TED talks are renowned for providing a stage for great people with great ideas... 

Speaking at TED means a lot of global attention, and Myhrvold played his cards right. With a display of the invention that uses laser technology to shoot down mosquitoes on the wing, and some stunning video footage, it was certain that the global press would jump on the story. Hundreds of websites and facebook pages covered this breakthrough, that was twittered to hundreds of thousands of people around the planet. Intellectual Ventures, the company headed by Myhrvold, has done well this week.

Interestingly, although the world may think this is a new invention, it is not. The Wall Street Journal ran an article on the same invention on 14 March 2009. Back then the video footage wasn't as exciting, leading to limited press attention. But why did Myhrvold not use the last ten months to demonstrate the potential of his invention in the real world, in a rural setting somewhere in Africa?

CLOSED: PhD Studentships in The Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases : Camden Town, Greater London WC1E 7, UK

February 13, 2010 - 20:04 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine invites applications for Three PhD studentships in the Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases.

What do bednets and Trabant cars have in common?

February 3, 2010 - 16:08 -- Bart G.J. Knols

There is a good reason for putting out a large variety of products with similar function on the market – like cars. It simply has to do with our innate differences in preference with regard to colour, shape, make, etc. Some like a blue car, others a white or a red one. And, suprise surprise, the great level of differentation means that almost everyone can find a car that matches his/her preferences at an affordable price....

Transgenic human skin bacteria to produce repellents?

February 1, 2010 - 08:07 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Ninety years ago it was discovered that mosquitoes track us down at night by responding to the smell we as humans produce. Since then, many studies have focused on identifying the nature of the chemicals we produce with the aim to use them to lure mosquitoes to trapping devices, thereby interrupting bloodfeeding and thus transmission of diseases like malaria. But why is there still no trap available for use in the developing world where malaria hits hardest?

Healthy houses make happy homes - outcome of a workshop

January 23, 2010 - 14:01 -- Bart G.J. Knols
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The statistics say it all: 70% of the transmission of infectious diseases is focused in and around the house. Including malaria, where the key vectors in Africa are almost exclusively feeding indoors and at night. The forum on MalariaWorld that discussed this issue was very well read (more than 1000 views), and although comments were limited, it was enough to move forward with the idea...

Your mosquito stock: your responsibility

January 21, 2010 - 18:40 -- Mark Benedict

Those who colonize mosquitoes are rightfully protective of them. Some species require a large amount of work to establish in the laboratory, and many of you have given your blood, sweat, holidays, and earnest attention to ensuring they exist. When you distribute it, you are giving a gift.

Larval control: When the tools are fine but their application goes wrong…

January 12, 2010 - 12:26 -- Bart G.J. Knols
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In most African countries bednets have become common and are contributing to saving countless lives of children. Scaling up of this intervention continues in the second decade of this millennium. Indoor residual spraying is widely practiced though a less common sight in many parts of Africa where spray teams do not reach far-off communities in rural settings.

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