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Ingeborg van Schayk's blog

Last week at MalariaWorld: Job opportunity, call for innovation and the first WHO film festival, and more...

November 14, 2019 - 10:50 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

FIND Call For Innovation

Accelerating the development of next generation malaria rapid diagnostic tools
The objective of this call is to identify malaria innovations that have the potential to address the technical and operational limitations of current malaria RDTs. Application deadline November 22, 2019... Read more

 


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The Health for All Film Festival

WHO invites filmmakers to participate in our inaugural film festival
In May 2020, on the occasion of the 73rd World Health Assembly, WHO will host the first-ever Health for All Film Festival in Geneva.  Whether you are an amateur filmmaker seeking to tell the story of change-makers in your community through the lens of your smartphone or you're working with a production company to promote dialogue around global health challenges and solutions, WHO wants to see your story... Read more


This weeks Malaria Minute Podcast

Female Mosquitoes That Have Mated More Likely to Transmit Malaria
Hormones received during mating boost the likelihood of malaria transmission and an ongoing autoimmune attack on uninfected red blood cells can ultimately anaemia. Listen to this Podcast


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Global malaria news

Scientists identify immune cells linked to malaria-induced anemia through autoantibody production
Science Daily, 12 November 2019
An autoimmune attack on uninfected red blood cells likely contributes to anemia -- a shortage of red blood cells -- in people with malaria... Read more

Mated female mosquitoes are more likely to transmit malaria parasites
Science Daily, 7 November 2019
Female mosquitoes that have mated are more likely to transmit malaria parasites than virgin females, according to a new study... Read more
 

Read more global malaria news here


Scientific Publications

Read the latest scientific malaria publications here

Enjoy this week's MalariaWorld - the MW team
 


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Press release: Researchers receive $10.2 million to study new malaria-prevention method

December 11, 2015 - 06:43 -- Ingeborg van Schayk
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- In collaboration with partners in Europe and Africa, researchers at Penn State have received a five-year, $10.2-million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to investigate a new method for preventing the transmission of malaria. The method involves limiting mosquito access to houses by blocking openings and installing "eave tubes" that contain a unique type of insecticide-laced mosquito netting developed by Dutch partner In2Care that kills the insects as they attempt to enter. 
 

World Malaria Report 2018 is out!

November 20, 2018 - 16:22 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

This year's report shows that after an unprecedented period of success in global malaria control, progress has stalled. Data from 2015–2017 highlight that no significant progress in reducing global malaria cases was made in this period. There were an estimated 219 million cases and 435 000 related deaths in 2017.

The World malaria report 2018 draws on data from 91 countries and areas with ongoing malaria transmission. The information is supplemented by data from national household surveys and databases held by other organizations.

Looking back at MIM2018: Some food for thought

April 26, 2018 - 20:26 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

I visited the largest malaria conference on the African continent. More than 2.000 malaria professionals gathered in Dakar for the 7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria Conference. Every day started with a plenary session presented by 2 keynote speakers: 12 keynote addresses by 12 renowned scientists. But... only 2 were African.

How One Child’s Sickle Cell Mutation Helped Protect the World From Malaria

March 13, 2018 - 17:25 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

8 March 2018, Carl Zimmer (New York Times)

The genetic mutation arose 7,300 years ago in just one person in West Africa, scientists reported on Thursday. Its advantage: a shield against rampant malaria.

Thousands of years ago, a special child was born in the Sahara. At the time, this was not a desert; it was a green belt of savannas, woodlands, lakes and rivers. Bands of hunter-gatherers thrived there, catching fish and spearing hippos.

Building out vector-borne diseases in Africa – launch of new research network and funding call!

September 8, 2017 - 07:44 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

Durham University and University College London are pleased to announce the establishment of a new multi-disciplinary research network called the BOVA (Building out vector-borne diseases in sub-Saharan Africa) Network. 

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