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CLOSED: Job: Keele University - Postdoctoral Research Associate Bioinformatics

July 21, 2011 - 19:26 -- Ingeborg van Schayk
Organisation: Keele University, Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine
Location: UK
Term: Fixed term for three years
Starting salary: Grade 7, £29,972
Closing date for applications: 16 August 2011
Ref: RE11/14MW

Waking up in the face of resistance?

July 7, 2011 - 15:54 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Sometimes you come across articles that blow your mind. You read them and feel your heartbeat increasing. Each sentence you finish makes you wonder more what is going on here. What the politics are, who's really behind it, and what the goal of it is....

Book: The Moses of Malaria

June 18, 2011 - 09:46 -- Bart G.J. Knols
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The book 'The Moses of Malaria', authored by Dr. Jan Peter Verhave, which was published recently by Erasmus Publishing in The Netherlands (find more information here), is all about the life and work of Professor Nicolaas Swellengrebel (1885-1970), beyond doubt one of the most important and influential scientists of 20th Century Holland.

Eight Million Treated Mosquito Nets Due Distribution In Cameroon

June 16, 2011 - 12:49 -- Bart G.J. Knols
The article below was contributed by journalist Ntaryike Divine Jr. (Douala, Cameroon) as part of the SjCOOP project in collaboration with MalariaWorld.


The government of Cameroon is verging on enacting one of its biggest efforts yet in its protracting battle against malaria, which has obstinately upheld its status as the country’s leading killer disease.  Over 8 million treated mosquito nets are due distribution by August ending in the malaria-endemic Central African nation which is home to 20 million inhabitants.

CLOSED: Job: Glasgow University - Postdoctoral Research Associate in Malaria Vector Ecology

June 9, 2011 - 20:14 -- Ingeborg van Schayk
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Organisation: University of Glasgow, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine



Location: Tanzania
Closing date: 8th July 2011
Ref: M00269  

CLOSED: AvecNet PhD Studentship: ecological and genetic determinants of malaria vector behaviours

June 9, 2011 - 19:54 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

Organisation:  Ifakara Health Institute, Tanzania and the University of Glasgow, UK    


Location of PhD:
Ifakara Health Institute, Tanzania and UG, UK. Registered for PhD at UG
Duration: 3 years, commencing October 2011
Proposed Supervisors: Nico Govella (IHI) and Heather Ferguson (UG)
Closing date for applications: 1st July 2011

CLOSED: Job: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Post-doctoral Research Assistant (Ref 320) Vector Group

May 26, 2011 - 19:39 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

Closing date for receiving applications: 10.00am, (BST) Tuesday 21st June 2011
Salary: £30,870 - £35,789 per annum Grade 7
Full-time fixed-term 2 Year Appointment

Uganda: ACT treatment is too expensive

May 12, 2011 - 21:22 -- Bart G.J. Knols
The article below was contributed by journalist Hope Mafaranga (Uganda) as part of the SjCOOP project in collaboration with MalariaWorld.


The government of Uganda wants people to use Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT) for treating malaria but the treatment is too expensive and there’s not enough available of this medicine. 

CLOSED: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine AvecNet PhD Studentship: Health Economics and Policy

May 11, 2011 - 19:10 -- Ingeborg van Schayk



The overreaching objective of AvecNet is to develop new tools for malaria vector control in Africa. The mandate includes a commitment to develop research capacity in this field and as a result we will be offering a number of PhD studentships to outstanding young scientists who wish to pursue a career in malaria vector control in Africa.

Maximising the translation potential of new malaria control tools through application of health economics and policy analysis

Organisation:
 Liverpool School of tropical Medicine
Location of PhD: LSTM, UK with field work in one or more African country. Registered for PhD at LSTM
Duration: 3 years, commencing 2012
Closing date for applications:  18th June 2011

AvecNet Project
A new multi-partner, interdisciplinary consortium, AvecNet, has recently been established with funding from the European Commission (www.avecnet.eu). The overreaching objective of AvecNet is to develop new tools for malaria vector control in Africa. The mandate includes a commitment to develop research capacity in this field and as a result we will be offering a number of PhD studentships to outstanding young scientists who wish to pursue a career in malaria vector control in Africa.

Rationale
New tools are needed to help the fight against malaria. AvecNet aims to develop and evaluate new tools to prevent mosquito mediated transmission of malaria and translate them into improved malaria control in Africa. These tools will be evaluated in field trials to determine their effectiveness. Acceptability to end users will also be assessed using stakeholder analysis. Effectiveness and end user acceptability are necessary but not sufficient criteria for the wide scale adoption of a new intervention. This PhD will focus on identifying and prioritising the economic and policy evidence base required to influence key actors and maximise the translation potential of new interventions for malaria vector control. During the latter part of the PhD, the candidate will work with AvecNet scientists to generate and package evidence on new interventions developed during this project in a way most likely to influence policy and practice. 

Objectives
1. To map the key stakeholders/actors involved in policy making, financing, delivery and use of vector control tools at household, local, national and international levels, and to determine the economic, political and other motivating objectives and influences implicated in translation of vector control tools for each stakeholder group
2. To define the evidence base and policy environment required to influence key actors and maximise translation potential of new/improved vector control tools 
3. To participate in the cost effectiveness analysis of vector control tools developed under AvecNet
4. To analyse the equity implications of new vector control tools, and potential alternative delivery systems
5. To analyse the health systems implications of introduction and scale up of new vector control tools

Training
This PhD will combine health economics tools (e.g. cost effectiveness and equity analysis) with policy analysis methods. In the first year, a tailored training programme will be developed including the principles of malaria transmission and control and theoretical frameworks for equity, cost-effectiveness, health systems, policy analysis. The candidate will also have opportunities to interact with AvecNet partners in field sites in Africa to witness some of the challenges facing scale up of vector control. In the latter part of the PhD, the candidate will be expected to spend significant time in Africa working alongside field trials of new interventions. The PhD will culminate in the development of a practical plan or “roadmap” to maximise translation potential of vector control tools and ultimately improve malaria control in Africa. 

Pre-requisites
• Previous experience working on public health economics, health systems and/or health policy issues
• Good understanding of international and national level health policy processes, actors and priorities
• BSc/MSc in economics and/or public policy or closely related field
• Commitment to working in a multi-disciplinary team
• Willingness to spend part of PhD in UK and an African country 
• Ability to maintain a strategic focus at the same time as working on detailed micro analysis

Capacity building in malaria endemic countries is a key objective of the AvecNet project. Although there are no nationality restrictions on this PhD position, applications from African nationals would be welcomed. All applicants would be expected to demonstrate a commitment to building research capacity in malaria research in Africa.

Further information on this PhD can be obtained fromeworrall@liverpool.ac.uk

This PhD is currently open to applications. To apply please send a CV and cover letter explaining your reasons for applying to eworrall@liv.ac.uk 

Closing date for applications is 18th June 2011.

 

CLOSED: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine AvecNet PhD Studentship

May 11, 2011 - 19:00 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

The overreaching objective of AvecNet is to develop new tools for malaria vector control in Africa. The mandate includes a commitment to develop research capacity in this field and as a result we will be offering a number of PhD studentships to outstanding young scientists who wish to pursue a career in malaria vector control in Africa.

Organisation: Liverpool School of tropical Medicine
Location of PhD: NIMR Tanzania and LSTM, UK. Registered for PhD at LSTM
Duration: 3 years, commencing October 2011
Closing date for applications:  18th June 2011

AvecNet Project
A new multi-partner, interdisciplinary consortium, AvecNet, has recently been established with funding from the European Commission (www.avecnet.eu). The overreaching objective of AvecNet is to develop new tools for malaria vector control in Africa. The mandate includes a commitment to develop research capacity in this field and as a result we will be offering a number of PhD studentships to outstanding young scientists who wish to pursue a career in malaria vector control in Africa. 

Rationale
The effects of residual insecticide treatments on the host seeking and resting behaviour of endophilic malaria vectors are not well understood. The possible range of behavioural responses that such insecticides might elicit is great, with each response potentially influencing how effective any insecticide might be, how resistance might develop and how rapidly such a process might take. Moreover, insecticide resistant populations might exhibit different responses. This aspect of insecticide action is rarely investigated and lags behind our knowledge of the genetics of insecticide resistance.

Using state-of-the-art techniques, being developed in collaboration with the Mechanical Engineering Department at Leeds University, we are investigating these behaviours in the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae in the laboratory and in the field. Working with other groups within the multidisciplinary research consortium AVECNET (we aim to characterise behaviour in insecticide susceptible populations from Tanzania prior to studies on resistant populations. Work will be undertaken in unique laboratory experimental facilities in UK and in experimental huts in the field in Africa.

The student will be responsible for building quantifiable and reproducible profiles of a series of behaviours in mosquitoes that will provide a basis for the detection of any potential changes that might occur with insecticide resistance. 

Objectives
1. To investigate approach and landing responses of Anopheles gambiae to residual treatments of insecticides at the micro and macro-behavioural level, using new tracking technologies, in the laboratory
2. To develop these protocols for use in similar studies and in experimental hut studies on natural mosquito populations in the field in Tanzania
3. To determine how insecticides, deployed by various standard methods in houses, impact on mosquito behaviour and how mosquito behaviours might influence the efficacy of individual insecticides
4. To investigate the association between behavioural profiles and molecular markers of resistance in different susceptible and resistant mosquito populations in Africa

Training
This PhD will combine cutting edge insect tracking technology with field entomology. During initial studies at Liverpool, the student will learn how to undertake laboratory studies quantifying behaviour prior to work in Tanzania. The student will receive training in insect behaviour experimental techniques and associated technology. Liaising with collaborators investigating the same mosquito populations at the genetic level, there may be additional opportunities for molecular investigations.

Pre-requisites
• Previous experience working with malaria vectors in the field
• Good understanding of vector behaviour
• BSc/MSc in biological sciences
• Scientifically inquisitive with a commitment to learning and applying complex laboratory and statistical techniques
• Willingness to spend part of PhD in UK 
• Commitment to a career in malaria vector control in Africa

Capacity building in malaria endemic countries is a key objective of the AvecNet project. Although there are no nationality restrictions on this PhD position, applications from African nationals with demonstrated interest and commitment to developing a long term career in malaria control in Africa are particularly encouraged. 

Further information on this PhD can be obtained frommccall@liverpool.ac.uk

This PhD is currently open to applications. To apply please send a CV and cover letter explaining your reasons for applying to eworrall@liv.ac.uk 

Closing date for applications is 18th June 2011.

Cameroon: Mosquito-proof Housing As Malaria Transmission Antidote

May 5, 2011 - 21:14 -- Bart G.J. Knols

The article below was contributed by journalist Ntaryike Divine Jr. (Douala, Cameroon) as part of the SjCOOP project in collaboration with MalariaWorld.

For several years, bednets and insecticide spraying have served as priority weapons in the fight against malaria transmission across Africa.  However, the defiant vampire vectors and malaria parasites in their mad quests for survival have regularly altered tactics, formulating resistance to insecticides and even drugs to maintain their claim on human lives. 

 

Hot or hot air? Media acclaim of gene drive in a mosquito

April 29, 2011 - 16:36 -- Mark Benedict
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You’ve probably noticed that the number of pages in newspapers and science journals does not expand and contract much while the importance of underlying news stories varies wildly. So is the hoopla surrounding the recent report of a demonstration of gene drive in mosquitoes about something hot or just a bunch of hot air? I’ll tell you what I think.

Cameroon Introduces Rapid Malaria Diagnosis

April 28, 2011 - 20:35 -- Bart G.J. Knols
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The article below was contributed by journalist Ntaryike Divine Jr. (Douala, Cameroon) as part of the SjCOOP project in collaboration with MalariaWorld.

The government of Cameroon is opting for an innovative approach in its ongoing efforts at winning the protracting battle against malaria.  By the end of April, it will begin doling out some 800.000 kits designed for rapid malaria tests to healthcare facilities nationwide. 


ACTs: What will happen when the cat gets out of the bag?

April 11, 2011 - 20:47 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Most of us that have worked in the field of malaria for a few decades have gone through periods where we suddenly noticed changes in drug policy. When chloroquine was replaced by sulfadoxine-pyremethamine as a first-line drug, later to be replaced by artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs).

But the world is now faced with a new challenge. That of preventing artemisinin resistance from escaping south-east Asia. Without anything to replace it (yet), this is a looming catastrophe, according to Joel Breman in an interview with TropIKA.net. It may still be confined to the Thai-Cambodia border, although nobody really nows have far it has spread.

Malaria Group Seeks Permanent Home in Cameroon

April 7, 2011 - 15:01 -- Bart G.J. Knols

The article below was contributed by journalist Leocadia Bongben (Cameroon) as part of the SjCOOP project in collaboration with MalariaWorld.

An international alliance of malaria scientists, whose secretariat has roved around the planet until now, is planning to settle down permanently in Yaoundé. 

 

The Multilateral Initiative for Malaria (MIM), established in 1997, was previously headquartered in London, Washington, Stockholm and Dar es Salaam.

Entomopathogenic fungi against the malaria vector Anopheles funestus: PhD thesis Dr. Joel Mouatcho

April 7, 2011 - 13:29 -- Bart G.J. Knols

The use of entomopathogenic fungi as a means to control populations of adult malaria vectors is gaining increased attention. Recently we reported on the PhD thesis of Dr. Marit Farenhorst, and below we report the findings from the PhD of Dr. Joel Mouatcho, who recently graduated from the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa.

Special issue of PLoS Medicine on a Global Research Agenda for Malaria Eradication

January 25, 2011 - 21:48 -- Bart G.J. Knols

The editors of the open access general medical journal PLoS Medicine are delighted to announce the publication of a collection of 12 reviews, comprising three reflective pieces and nine research and development agendas, as part of a sponsored Supplement. The Collection comprises the output of countless hours of discussion and debate by those involved in the malERA initiative and we hope that by publishing this Collection better transparency in defining research priorities will be achieved for malariologists around the world. The articles also provide fascinating insights into what the selected malaria experts who took part agree are the priority research themes that must be tackled in order to eradicate malaria.   

Let it snow: field-testing malaria-refractory strains by inundation

January 24, 2011 - 18:54 -- Mark Benedict

In July of 2010, the Mike Riehle lab reported that they had created a transgenic strain of Anopheles stephensi that was refractory to malaria (first author Corby-Harris (here and here). However, as they noted, there is no way to spread the transgene into wild populations thus making this an important laboratory finding waiting for an undeveloped drive mechanism. I’ll argue that this provides an opportunity rather than a hurdle. How? Read on.

Guest Editorial: Is eliminating malaria hopeless?

January 22, 2011 - 15:06 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Chris Blattman is an Assistant Professor of Political Science & Economics at Yale University. He uses field work and statistics to study poverty, political participation, the causes and consequences of violence, and policy in developing countries. Read his website here. I invited Chris to post his blog on malaria on the MW platform, shown below.

 

Happy New Year! Getting serious about GMO risks in 2011

January 1, 2011 - 23:34 -- Mark Benedict

As a gift to start 2011, I thought I’d help the anti-GMO-no-way-no-how folks with a critique of their arguments, and I’ll offer some real meat for them with which they might get greater respect. Let’s start 2011 by establishing some common ground.

 

 

Natural products for malaria vector control: flora, fish and fungi

December 28, 2010 - 17:16 -- Bart G.J. Knols
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Below and attached you will find the abstract and summary of the PhD thesis of Annabel Howard. She graduated in October from Wageningen University on her thesis with the above title.

Currently, Annabel is preparing to move to Angola. Interested parties can contact her for collaborative activities in the field of malaria.

Elimination and the risk of malaria coming back afterwards

December 3, 2010 - 06:32 -- Bart G.J. Knols

This week a 31 year-old woman living in Jacksonville, Florida, got infected with the most deadly form of malaria, Plasmodium falciparum. Just weeks ago a similar report came from Spain, where indigenous transmission occurred and led to the first case of malaria since 1961.

E-interview with Prof. Brian Greenwood (UK, 1938)

November 28, 2010 - 20:55 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Brian Greenwood is Professor of Clinical Tropical Medicine at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the UK. From 2001 -2009 he directed the Gates Malaria Partnership which supported a programme of research and capacity development in many countries in Africa directed at improving treatment and prevention of malaria. In 2008, he became director of a new capacity development initiative supported by the Wellcome Trust and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Malaria Capacity Development Consortium (MCDC), which operates a post-graduate malaria training programme in five countries in sub-Saharan Africa, and he also directs a new consortium (MenAfriCar) established with support from the Wellcome Trust and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to study meningococcal carriage in Africa.

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