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Zanzibar: Where have all the patients gone?

October 6, 2009 - 09:38 -- Bart G.J. Knols

In a recent commentary published by CNN, Tachi Yamada, President of the Global Health Programme at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, expressed his euforism about the malaria control activities on the island of Zanzibar. And not without reason. He visited a paediatric ward and found empty beds. No sick children, no suffering because of malaria. Indeed a reason to be happy. Zanzibar has hammered malaria over the last five years to the extent where it 'has virtually eliminated the disease' according to Yamada.

Eradication, elimination, and control: Knowing the past of malaria

September 18, 2009 - 08:37 -- Bart G.J. Knols

I attended a most interesting meeting yesterday in Wageningen (The Netherlands) where some 30 scientists and representatives of donor organisations gathered. Two scientists from disease-endemic countries (Rwanda and Kenya) presented case studies to the audience. These were followed by a mini 'open space' meeting where attendees could submit questions on post-its for discussion in small groups.

The scare about monkey malaria

September 15, 2009 - 20:00 -- Bart G.J. Knols

It has been an interesting week regarding the latest addition to the list of species of malaria parasites that can infect humans: Plasmodium knowlesi. I was interviewed by two Dutch radio programmes that picked up the scare from the BBC World website . Apparently there was also a Dutch tourist that returned back home from Sarawak with this 'deadly form of monkey malaria'....

Seven misconceptions about malaria prevention

September 14, 2009 - 12:06 -- Bart G.J. Knols
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Anyone serious about African safaris is serious about malaria. The sheer number of deaths caused by this parasitic disease simply puts the mosquito as the number 1 most dangerous animal in the world. Ten children will have died of malaria in the time it takes you to read this blog. I have never sat around a camp fire whilst on safari without malaria being discussed one way or the other. Some fantastic stories persist, and here are some really good ones:

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