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'Mosquito: The fascinating world of public enemy number I' is out

November 27, 2009 - 11:22 -- Bart G.J. Knols

'Mug: De fascinerende wereld van volksvijand nummer I' went on sale in Dutch bookstores last Friday. The book (in Dutch) was written for the general public, to become familiarised with the difficulties of controlling diseases like malaria in developing countries. Given the absence of malaria in the Netherlands since 1959, the Dutch population has now lived for five decades without the threat of a mosquito-borne disease. There is therefore remarkably little general knowledge about mosquito-borne diseases, notably malaria.

Will Kenya eliminate malaria by 2017?

November 23, 2009 - 08:58 -- Bart G.J. Knols
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The atmosphere in the press room was one of excitement, when it was announced that Kenya would see its last case of endemic malaria in the year 2017

This date came from the 2007 Malaria Indicator Survey, showing that malaria is on the decline in various parts of the country. Kenya has therefore chosen the path towards elimination, and will do so when having sufficient funding.

Think globally: act ... area-wide

November 20, 2009 - 22:15 -- Mark Benedict
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MalariaWorld Newsletter recipients would need to have their heads buried in the sand if they were not well aware of numerous threats to the current methods for reducing malaria transmission. Whether the intervention is insecticides or drugs, their sustainability is threatened by failures which - it is hoped - will not become widespread. Of greater concern for those who are responsible for implementing programs are the complexities of applying control methods in different cultures, education in different languages and achieving sufficient compliance.

Malaria Elimination and Eradication: Starting as We Mean to Continue

October 30, 2009 - 09:36 -- Richard Feachem

The E words, Eradication and Elimination, are firmly back on the table after at least 2 decades in which they could not be mentioned in polite malaria company. The last two years have seen remarkable progress in translating these concepts into clear strategies and substantial action.

Zanzibar: Where have all the patients gone?

October 6, 2009 - 09:38 -- Bart G.J. Knols

In a recent commentary published by CNN, Tachi Yamada, President of the Global Health Programme at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, expressed his euforism about the malaria control activities on the island of Zanzibar. And not without reason. He visited a paediatric ward and found empty beds. No sick children, no suffering because of malaria. Indeed a reason to be happy. Zanzibar has hammered malaria over the last five years to the extent where it 'has virtually eliminated the disease' according to Yamada.

Eradication, elimination, and control: Knowing the past of malaria

September 18, 2009 - 08:37 -- Bart G.J. Knols

I attended a most interesting meeting yesterday in Wageningen (The Netherlands) where some 30 scientists and representatives of donor organisations gathered. Two scientists from disease-endemic countries (Rwanda and Kenya) presented case studies to the audience. These were followed by a mini 'open space' meeting where attendees could submit questions on post-its for discussion in small groups.

The scare about monkey malaria

September 15, 2009 - 20:00 -- Bart G.J. Knols

It has been an interesting week regarding the latest addition to the list of species of malaria parasites that can infect humans: Plasmodium knowlesi. I was interviewed by two Dutch radio programmes that picked up the scare from the BBC World website . Apparently there was also a Dutch tourist that returned back home from Sarawak with this 'deadly form of monkey malaria'....

Seven misconceptions about malaria prevention

September 14, 2009 - 12:06 -- Bart G.J. Knols
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Anyone serious about African safaris is serious about malaria. The sheer number of deaths caused by this parasitic disease simply puts the mosquito as the number 1 most dangerous animal in the world. Ten children will have died of malaria in the time it takes you to read this blog. I have never sat around a camp fire whilst on safari without malaria being discussed one way or the other. Some fantastic stories persist, and here are some really good ones:

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