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Transmission blocking vaccines fail, but Artemisia is very efficient

August 4, 2018 - 13:05 -- Pierre Lutgen

Vaccines blocking the invasion of malaria sporozoites failed so far, after 30 years of efforts, millions spent, and disastrous human clinical trials. The efforts and the millions are now focused on vaccines blocking transmission by gametocytes. The results are not yet encouraging but the updated Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap foresees that there will be a TBV vaccine available in 2030. The update was necessary as the program launched by WHO in 2000 ( TDR/RBM/MAL/VAC/2000.1) has not yet progressed very far.

        Ogobara K. Doumbo, Karamoko Niaré, Sara A. Healy, Issaka Sagara and Patrick E. Duffy. Blocking Vaccines: Present Status and Future Perspectives. In Book: Towards Malaria Elimination - A leap forward 2018. Edited by Sylvie Manguin and Dr Vas Dev ISBN: 978-1-78923-551-7

        Talaat KR, Ellis RD, Hurd J, Hentrich A, Gabriel E, Hynes NA, et al. (2016) Safety and Immunogenicity of Pfs25-EPA/Alhydrogel1, a Transmission Blocking Vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum: An Open Label Study in Malaria Naïve Adults. PLoS ONE 2016 11(10): e0163144. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0163144

        Ishino T, Tsuboi T. Progress toward a transmission-blocking vaccine against malaria. Lancet Infect Dis. 2018 Jul 27. pii: S1473-3099(18)30358-X. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30358-X.

One may wonder why the authors of these recent papers do not mention the breathtaking transmission blocking results obtained with Artemisia plants in Africa. These authors and research teams sponsored by Bigpharma are still on the laboratory bench and far from the community. Meanwhile a team of medical doctors in RDCongo, Jerome Munyangi and Michel Idumbo, have run randomized clinical trials on a large scale in the Maniema province with the participation of some 1000 malaria infected patients. The trials were run in conformity with the WHO procedures and compared Artemisia annua and Artemisia afra with ACTs (Coartem and ASAQ). For all the parameters tested herbal treatment was significantly better than ACTs: faster clearance for fever and parasitemia, absence of parasites on day 28 for 99.5% of the Artemisia treatments and 79.5% only for the ACT treatments…. The efficiency was equivalent for Artemisia annua and Artemisia afra. The results of this RDCongo team confirm previous results on the extraordinary prophylactic, suppressive and curative power of Artemisia plants.

More important even is the observation for the total absence of gametocytes after 7 days treatment with the herb and that up to 28 days.

        Pierre Lutgen. Breaking news from clinical trials with Artemisia plants. www.malariaworld.org. January 5, 2016

So far this document had 34830 readers. It was also published in a peer reviewed scientific journal. 

         Jérôme Munyangi, Pierre Lutgen, Lucile Cornet-Vernet, Artemisia plants, a deadly weapon against tropical diseases. Int J Clin Res Trials 2016, 1: 109. http://dx.doi.org/10.15344/ijcrt/2016/109

A tremendous hope for malaria eradication.