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Last week at MalariaWorld: It's raining malaria jobs!

August 12, 2016 - 07:35 -- Ingeborg van Schayk

This week we are listing another exciting position at the Sanger Institute:

Position: Staff scientist, Experimental Genetics

There is an opening for a Staff Scientist in the Rayner lab (Sanger Institute) to lead the delivery of large-scale Plasmodium falciparum experimental genetics projects. The candidate will collaborate with the PlasmoGEM team and the Sanger Cellular Genetics Pipeline to lead knockout screens of hundreds of genes. The primary objective is to deliver novel scientific projects that result in high impact publications. The successful candidate will be a strong team player, a self-starter and keen to make the most of this exciting opportunity. It would particularly suit postdoctoral fellows with experience in Plasmodium falciparum genetics, who want to lead and take responsibility for a larger project, and work in a deeply collaborative and technologically rapidly moving environment. For more information, click here.
 
Don't forget last week's positions and keep the deadlines for application in mind:
 
Position: Country Director Equatorial Guinea

An exciting position for a senior manager as Country Director in Equatorial Guinea, with Medical Care Development International (MCDI). He/she will manage and represent its portfolio of health projects in Equatorial Guinea, Central Africa. Ongoing projects include the Bioko Island Malaria Control Project (BIMCP III), the Equatorial Guinea Malaria Vaccine Initiative (EGMVI) and the Equatorial Guinea Cervical Cancer Screening and Treatment Project. Interested? Click here.

5 PhD and 10 Post doc positions available

MARCAD seeks to train African scientists toward building a critical mass for the control and the elimination of malaria, equip them to compete effectively for international funding, offer them international exposure, and facilitate their networking and collaboration with other institutions.  Fellowships will be held at one of the five African-based institutions. Three MARCAD fellows will be hosted within strong interdisciplinary teams at one of the five African institutions, one PhD and two post-docs. Want to know more? Click here.

Enjoy this week's MalariaWorld - the MW team

and we look forward to receiving your manuscripts for the MalariaWorld Journal!
 

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Remember to apply for APMEN positions!

July 22, 2016 - 09:50 -- MESA Alliance
Dear colleagues,
 
Time is running out to apply for an exciting position in the new APMEN office in Singapore.  Applications are closing next week on Friday, 29 July.
We would like to encourage our colleagues within and outside of the Network to apply, and to join us in accelerating malaria elimination in the Asia-Pacific region.
The candidates who secure these positions will have the opportunity to be part of the fast-moving malaria elimination agenda. They will work together with the Asia Pacific Leaders Malaria Alliance (APLMA) team at the heart of the new regional movement for an Asia-Pacific Free of Malaria by 2030.  With 18 member countries and 37 international institutional partners – and still growing, working with us will expose you to an exciting range of contexts, contacts and opportunities. 
If you think you or someone you know has the skills to lead or contribute to a dynamic partnership of program managers, academic, private sector partners to achieve this important common goal – please apply now via one of the links below:
 
 
If you have any questions about these roles, please feel free to contact the APMEN Secretariat at info@apmen.org.
We would be grateful if you would circulate these opportunities among your networks.
 
With best regards,
 
The APMEN Secretariat

Guest editorial: “End Malaria for Good”- a few key messages based on the Cambodian experience

June 23, 2016 - 07:27 -- Bart G.J. Knols
The editorial below was contributed by Sara E Canavati and Jack S Richards. Contact details below.
 
World Malaria Day (WMD) is an international observance established in 2007 and commemorated every year on 25 April to recognize global efforts to control malaria. The theme for 2016 was “End Malaria For Good”, which focused on malaria elimination. Following the great progress made under the Millennium Development Goals, it is important to continue building on this success as we transition into the Sustainable Development Goals [1] and the recently launched Global Technical Strategy for Malaria (GTS) [2]. The aim of the piece is to briefly reflect on WMD 2016 and consider a few key operational issues on malaria elimination that may lie ahead for the coming year.

New report from WHO on malaria elimination

June 5, 2016 - 21:09 -- Bart G.J. Knols
This report, presented on World Malaria Day 2016, focuses on the third goal from the Global Technical Strategy for malaria: 2016-2030: malaria elimination. It offers a brief analysis of recent country-level progress towards elimination and spotlights countries that are poised to reach the finish line in the next  five years.
 
A number of countries have had remarkable success in controlling malaria, and these achievements are hard-won. But in many respects, the hardest work is yet to come. This WHO report highlights the considerable challenges countries will face in their e orts to drive down malaria cases to zero and to prevent resurgences of this deadly disease.

Press release: Researchers receive $10.2 million to study new malaria-prevention method

December 11, 2015 - 06:43 -- Ingeborg van Schayk
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- In collaboration with partners in Europe and Africa, researchers at Penn State have received a five-year, $10.2-million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to investigate a new method for preventing the transmission of malaria. The method involves limiting mosquito access to houses by blocking openings and installing "eave tubes" that contain a unique type of insecticide-laced mosquito netting developed by Dutch partner In2Care that kills the insects as they attempt to enter. 
 

Quarterly report on recent developments in Vector Control

December 8, 2015 - 09:28 -- Bart G.J. Knols

This quarterly report, produced by Vector Works, is meant to update the malaria community in general, and particularly those interested in vector control, on recently published research related to the improvement or development of new or alternative vector control tools. The report summarizes relevant new studies and highlights possible interpretations and implications, and it provides links to the original work. Aspects of indoor residual spraying are not included here as they are addressed in another newsletter (http://www.africairs.net). Read on to discover the exciting new contributions to the vector control field.

Report: RBM-VCWG Consensus statement on housing and malaria

November 8, 2015 - 16:11 -- Bart G.J. Knols
This Consensus Statement on Housing and Malaria, released this month by the Vector Control Working Group of RBM, aims to review current evidence on the interaction between incremental housing improvements and malaria and to identify opportunities to contribute to global efforts for the control and elimination of malaria in line with the Global Technical Strategy (GTS) and Action and Investment to defeat Malaria (AIM). It is hoped that this docu‐ ment will encourage broader partnerships to realise the full potential of this promising complimentary approach and will help focus the research efforts required. Key actions for endemic countries and their partners are listed in the attached report. 
 
The full report is attached below.

Message from Dr. Pedro Alonso -Director, Global Malaria Programme (WHO)

October 30, 2015 - 07:23 -- Bart G.J. Knols

The message below, from Dr. Pedro Alonso, the Director of WHO's Global Malaria Programme was circulated today, 24 October 2015.

Dear colleagues and partners, 
  
In recent weeks, you may have seen press articles stating that the United Nations and partners are calling on the world to eradicate malaria by the year 2040. 
  
The World Health Organization (WHO) shares the vision of a malaria-free world and – to that end – we welcome the commitment of all of our partners. However, I would like to clarify the strategy, targets and timeline that our organization has endorsed at this point in time. 

Why do novel vector control tools have to be perfect if the RTS,S vaccine isn't?

October 22, 2015 - 21:46 -- Bart G.J. Knols

Last month there was great news for the malaria world: A detailed analysis of the impact of insecticide-treated bednets (LLINs), ACTs, and indoor residual spraying (IRS), showed that some 6.2 million deaths and 700 million cases were averted between 2000-2015, mostly since 2005. Add up the contribution of the vector control components, and it shows that 78% of all the gains originated from just these two tools: LLINs and IRS. Is it safe to draw the conclusion from this that vector control is and shall remain the integral and critical component that will lead us to a world without malaria by 2040? I think the answer to that is 'yes, very much so'.

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