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  • Reply to: Column: Where do you hang a mosquito net in the bush?   13 hours 43 min ago

    Prevent malaria or prevent war?

    The issue you raise Marit is very important, and poses serious ethical choices for those of us who are concerned with the fight against malaria in Africa. I have no easy answer, but maybe can think of one. However the ethical dilemma it poses then troubles me.

    How do we protect children from malaria in a war zone? The easy answer is that we can’t, so we should use our limited resources to fight malaria in stable areas where our efforts will endure. Efforts we make in war zones will be blown away in the violence of the conflict. From a public health perspective we realize that we can protect more people by working in stable areas. That is the easy answer from a conventional public health approach in which we count the number of lives saved for each dollar of effort.
    But what about the people: the families and children who are in those war zones? Can we just cross them off – throw them away because they are in the wrong place? Obviously for people like you Marit, with humanitarian spirits, we can’t throw those people away; in fact they seem to be the ones who need us the most. We must admire and appreciate people like you and others in MSF who go to these dangerous places and minister to those in greatest need. We can see that they are motivated by a loving concern for people unprotected by their own societies.
    But perhaps the reason for our dilemma is that we are mixing our concern for fighting this one specific disease – malaria – with our more basic concern for the well-being of people and their children caught in war. If malaria is our focus, then we might search for special medical or technical interventions against malaria. But what if our focus is simply to meet the most pressing need for these people in the war zone? Is malaria their greatest problem? Or is it an end to the violence? If our concern is for the people, why are we wasting our time fighting malaria when what they really need is Peace? Within their world, at this time, although malaria is important, it has a low priority in comparison with an end to the violence. Malaria has a high priority for us because we know so much about it, but perhaps Peace is more important for our friends caught in the war.
    So perhaps what we should be doing is seeking help from the UN to send a Peace-Keeping Force, and when the violence is ended, and then we can work on the issues next in priority, such as malaria. In reality however, the dilemma remains. We know that the UN is weak, and establishing Peace will take a long time. It might never even happen. The wars and violence in Afghanistan and Iraq have been going on for more than a dozen years. What should we do in the meantime; prevent malaria or prevent war? I am sorry Marit, I am afraid I really haven’t answered your question. Maybe some of our other readers can help us?

    Bill

  • Reply to: Tea against ACT: David against Goliath   18 hours 9 min ago

    Received from a partner additional pieces of information 1.and 2. Accordingly Zambia paid $2 400 000 for Coartem tablets in 2013 and received 200 000. The Conference of Cali quotes an average price of of $300/kg artemisinin.

    1. malaria.novartis.com/newsroom/feature-stories/zambia.shtml
    September 2013. Delivered in July, the first 200,000 Novartis pediatric treatments are starting to fill Zambia’s treatment gap. Over the years, Novartis has had a longstanding relationship with the Zambian government, supporting its efforts to meet immediate and anticipated malaria needs. Zambia was the first African country to make the bold switch in treatment guidelines from chloroquine to Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (ACTs) and contributed USD 24 million toward malaria control in 2013.

    2. Development of Industrial Scale Production of ss-artemisinin. International Symposium. Colombia, Cali. February 27- 28, 2012

  • Reply to: Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Method (LAMP): Low and Effective cost Novel Tool for Molecular Public Health   1 day 15 hours ago

    Dear Usa,
    My thesis work is also on LAMP and my work was going just fine for the last one and a half year. But recently i started getting false positives- as the negative control tubes with no template DNA but PCR grade-water also started showing ladder-like pattern in gel electrophoresis. I see a lot of people have also faced this problem. I'd like to know if anybody has found a solution to this.Feedback and help would be appreciated.
    Regards,
    Gaurvee,
    Panjab University,
    Chandigarh, India

  • Reply to: Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Method (LAMP): Low and Effective cost Novel Tool for Molecular Public Health   1 day 15 hours ago

    Dear Stephanie,
    My thesis work is also on LAMP and i am facing the same problem. If you have concluded your study please let me know how did you counter this problem.

    Regards,
    Gaurvee

  • Reply to: Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Method (LAMP): Low and Effective cost Novel Tool for Molecular Public Health   1 day 15 hours ago

    Hello all,
    My thesis work is also on LAMP and my work was going just fine for the last one and a half year. But recently i started getting false positives- as the negative control tubes with no template DNA but PCR grade-water also started showing ladder-like pattern in gel electrophoresis. I see a lot of people have also faced this problem. I'd like to know if anybody has found a solution to this.Feedback and help would be appreciated.
    Regards,
    Gaurvee,
    Panjab University,
    Chandigarh, India